Does ICCPR Protect Human Rights?

29 03 2014

According to state media reports in Egypt, 529 of Morsi’s supporters were sentenced to death in a single hearing by the Minya Criminal Court.

This is a ‘mass capital punishment’.

A question crossed my mind as I heard the news, will United Nations and Human Rights Committee be taking any action as the sentence violated the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR) that has been signed by Egypt?

Article 6(1) and 6(2) of ICCPR:

1. Every human being has the inherent right to life. This right shall be protected by law. No one shall be arbitrarily deprived of his life.morsi

2. In countries which have not abolished the death penalty, sentence of death may be imposed only for the most serious crimes in accordance with the law in force at the time of the commission of the crime and not contrary to the provisions of the present Covenant and to the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide. This penalty can only be carried out pursuant to a final judgement rendered by a competent court.

Article 14 of the ICCPR, which outlines a fair trial, mandates that anyone accused of a crime must have “adequate time and facilities for the preparation of his defense” and “to be tried in his presence.”

Egypt signed the ICCPR on August 4, 1967 and ratified the treaty on January 14, 1982; but it did something worse than countries that have not sign the treaty.

So, what is the use of making countries sign and ratify ICCPR if a country that ratified ICCPR can pass a sentence of ‘mass capital punishment’ to 529 people?

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What Is Universal Periodic Review

2 10 2013

UNHRC-logo_withtext

The Universal Periodic Review (UPR) is a mechanism of the Human Rights Council (HRC) which is an intergovernmental body made up of 47 states, to review how far the members of the United Nations follow the Human Rights. (All About The Universal Periodic Review (UPR) by SUHAKAM)

The UPR reviews all 192 United Nations (UN) Member States over a four-year cycle. The process consists of several steps. The review takes place at the Palais des Nations in Geneva, Switzerland.

Objectives:

  1. Improvement of human rights of the people.
  2. How far does the state fulfil the obligations and commitments of human rights, assessment of positive development and problems that are faced by the States in fulfilling the obligations.
  3. Enhance the State’s capacity and technical assistance, in consultation with, and with the consent of, the State concerned.
  4. Sharing the best practice of human rights among States and other stakeholders.
  5. Support for cooperation in promotion and protecting of human rights.
  6. Encourage full cooperation and engagement with the HRC, the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) and other human rights bodies.

Recommendations:

Recommendations are the final results of the UPR process, and are included in the final report. Although the recommendations are not binding, they act as a set of commitments by the State to improve the protection and promotion of human rights in their country. These recommendations will serve as benchmarks to the State, on what it must achieve until the next UPR cycle.





United Nations Human Rights Council’s UPR

30 09 2013

UPR-logoUPR stands for Universal Periodic Review. It is a process to review how far all the countries that are members of the United Nations follow the demands made by the United Nations Human Rights Council (UNHRC).

This year, our country, Malaysia will be reviewed by UNHRC. I think Malaysia is a very peaceful and fair country where all minority races are not being discriminated by our government.

Must all the United Nations members agree to all of the UNHRC demands? I feel that not every country needs to be the same as other countries and follow the same universal rules because every country and its citizen is unique and has different needs and values.

For example, Malaysia is an Islamic country while Roman Catholicism is the official religion of Monaco and Argentina. So, they are all different and each country has different social values and ways of live.

So, is it fair if we want all the countries in this world to follow a set of universal rules and values agreed by other countries whose needs and values are different? I think that not only it is wrong, in fact, it is against the human rights to force a country to accept any value or rule which is not suitable for the local people of the country, against their social values, religions or can cause lots of problems to the country. And it is not right to force a country to agree on something that is actually against their Constitutions and rules of laws.

Related articles:

COMANGO And Human Rights

PPMM’s NGI Round Table Discussion On UPR Human Rights Council 2013





PPMM’s NGI Round Table Discussion On UPR Human Rights Council 2013

23 01 2013
Uncle Azril Mohd. Amin (L) and I at the Auditorium Utama, Universiti Islam Antarabangsa.

Uncle Azril Mohd. Amin (L) and I (R) during the Forum Islam Dan Cabaran Semasa – Polemik Isu Kalimah Allah at the Auditorium Utama, Universiti Islam Antarabangsa.

I was very proud and honoured when the vice-president of Persatuan Peguam Muslim Malaysia (PPMM), Uncle Azril Mohd Amin invited us to a round table meeting organised by PPMM at the Putrajaya Marriott Hotel yesterday.

It was a closed discussion and lots of lawyers were there as well as some Islamic NGOs or  NGIs activists.

My siblings and I were the only kids and teens whom were invited to that important discussion.

It was a great experience but I am sad because I don’t really understand what Uncle Azril said in his speech as he was speaking  in Malay language, using difficult words.

And I can’t even read words on the English written slide show for I forgot to wear my glasses.

But fortunately Uncle Azril, my parents and my big sisters helped me to understand more about the it later on.

What was discussed was about the demands made by the Coalition of Malaysian NGOs in the Universal Periodic Review Process (COMANGO) and also about the treaty made by the United Nations regarding LGBT which Malaysia haven’t sign because Malaysia is an Islamic country.

I was shocked when I read the demands made by COMANGO.

I think that most of the demands are unfair and bias because lots of them are against the human rights of most Malaysian and also against our Federal Constitution.

Furthermore a lot of important NGOs are not part of COMANGO, so COMANGO does not represend the voice of the majority of Malaysian.

Is it fair to force a sovereign country to change parts of its Federal Constitution and to go against the human rights of the majority of its citizens or robbing their human rights; just to a make small group of people happy?

How about my human rights if their demands were accepted; because some of their demands are against my human rights.

As a citizen, I also want my human rights to be protected even though I am just a kid and I do not want my human rights to be robbed by others who fight for their own agendas.

The United Nations must understand that every country is unique and the values and the needs of its citizens is different from others so nobody must be forced to accept a universal value as the only standard of human rights.

If Malaysian eat rice, nobody must force us to eat bread instead of rice; so if Malaysia do not accept or recognise certain values, nobody must rob our rights by forcing Malaysia to accept the values.

I want to thank Uncle Azril for inviting me to the discussion because it was an important discussion about an interesting topic about Human Rights, and I learned a lot of thing from it.





U.N. Chief: Anti-Islam Filmmaker Abused Freedom Of Expression

20 09 2012

U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon in Bern September 11, 2012. REUTERS/Pascal Lauener

UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) – U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said on Wednesday the maker of an anti-Islam film that triggered violent protests across the Muslim world abused his right to freedom of expression by making the movie, which he called a “disgraceful and shameful act.”

The film, posted on the Internet under several titles including “Innocence of Muslims,” mocked the Prophet Mohammad and portrayed him as a womanizer and a fool.

It sparked days of deadly anti-American violence in many Muslim countries, including an assault on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi in Libya in which the U.S. ambassador died.

“Freedoms of expression should be and must be guaranteed and protected, when they are used for common justice, common purpose,” Ban told a news conference.

“When some people use this freedom of expression to provoke or humiliate some others’ values and beliefs, then this cannot be protected in such a way.”

“My position is that freedom of expression, while it is a fundamental right and privilege, should not be abused by such people, by such a disgraceful and shameful act,” he said.

A California man convicted of bank fraud was taken in for questioning on Saturday by U.S. authorities investigating possible probation violations stemming from the making of the video. He has denied involvement in the film and has now gone into hiding.

(Reporting by Michelle Nichols; Editing by David Brunnstrom

I agree with the U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon that freedom of expression should not be abused to provoke or humiliate some others’ values and beliefs.

I protest over what Sam Bacile did as well as over the violence and killings during the protests over the film in some countries.

Muslims must protest but it must be done in a peaceful assembly or in other peaceful ways because that is how good Muslims should behave.

Related Post:

  1. Peaceful Assembly Over ‘Innocence of Muslims’ Is A     Waste Of Time But Bersih Is Not?
  2. Muslims Protest Over ‘Innocence of Muslims’





The Brave Tunku Abdul Aziz Ibrahim

11 05 2012

Tunku Abdul Aziz Ibrahim is a DAP vice chairman and a DAP senator but his senatorship won’t be renewed by DAP because DAP and the other opposition parties are not happy with him for not supporting Bersih 3.0 street rally.

Bersih 3.0 should be held in a stadium, if it is not held in a stadium that means the Bersih organisers broke the law, and by asking people to join the Bersih 3.0 street rally Tunku Aziz said, “Bersih encourages Malaysians to break the law”. 

He said, “I am in favour of us assembling if that is not breaking the law, and breaking the law is something that I cannot support as I am a lawmaker,”(The Star April 27, 2012).

Tunku Abdul Aziz also said that a huge street rally will be hard to be controlled, and there may be people who act violently and some people  might get hurt.

And after the Bersih riot when the Bersih 3.0 organisers and the opposition parties blamed the government and police for the riot he said that, “Bersih 3.0 organisers are not a group of angels descended from heaven who are completely blameless,” (blogsite The Mole).

Even though he was sad for not to be a senator any longer, he thinks that honour and integrity is better then fibbing for something.

I think that he is a good politician because he is brave, honest, and he dares to sacrifice for the people.

Opposition parties need to be more responsible, obey the law and be fair to everyone.

They should not run away from their responsibilities, put their supporters in danger and put the blame on other people.

I want to be a good politician and I also want to work in United Nations too, just like him.

Please click below to read my other posts on Bersih 3.0:

  1. Ranjit Singh Dhillon vs Bar Council On YouTube

  2. Bersih 3.0 – A Poem By Ahmad Ali Karim

  3. Bersih 3.0 Violence – The End Justifies The Means?

  4. Bersih 3.0:In Videos-Police Brutality?/Video-Keganasan Polis?

  5. Videos-Bersih 3.0 Riot Instigated By Anwar and Azmin?( Video-Anwar dan Azmin Signal Rempuh Dataran Merdeka?)

  6. Photos And Videos of Bersih 3.0 Riot (Gambar dan Video Rusuhan Bersih 3.0)

  7. Bersih 3.0 – As Peaceful As Promised?






Terrible Flood In Pakistan Is Getting Worse-Pictures

5 08 2010

The flooded village of Kot Addu in Punjab, August 4, 2010. (Reuters/ Stringer Photo)

The terrible flood in Pakistan is getting worse.

More than 1500 people were killed and over 3.2 million people effected by the flood.

Now Punjab is badly hit by the flood.

Water was so high, only treetops and uppermost floors of some buildings were visible in large tracts of Kot Addu and the nearby area of Layyah in the south of the province.

The flood is spreading to other areas in Pakistan too.

And more heavy rains are expected in the next few days.

More rain can cause more flood.

And there are lots of bad germs in the dirty flood water.

The flood victims are facing lots of waterborne diseases such as cholera, diarrhea and skin problems.

A lot of the flood victims don’t have clean water, enough food and medicine to fight the diseases.

More people will die especially the children.

The United Nations said that this is a terrible humanitarian disaster.

I think we should help the flood victims because the situation will get even worse if  we do not help them.

Pakistan army soldiers pass a baby across a water course as they help people flee from their flooded village following heavy monsoon rains in Taunsa near Multan, Pakistan, on Sunday, Aug. 1, 2010. The death toll from massive floods in northwestern Pakistan rose to 1,100 Sunday as rescue workers struggled to save more than 27,000 people still trapped by the raging water.(AP Photo/Khalid Tanveer)

Villagers stand on a rooftop as their house collapsed following floods in Taunsa near Multan, Pakistan on Sunday, Aug. 1, 2010.(AP Photo/Khalid Tanveer)

Pakistani villagers pull their belongings through deep floodwater on the outskirt of Dera Ghazi Khan, Pakistan on Wednesday, Aug. 4, 2010. This year's monsoon season has prompted the worst flooding in Pakistan in living memory and already killed more than 1,500 people, official said. (AP Photo/Sheikh Saleem Raza)

A flood victim in Nowshera, Pakistan. ( Photo by AFP)

Flood victims crossing a bridge in Peshawar, Pakistan. (Photo by AFP)

People affected by heavy flooding shift their households on a make-shift raft in Dera Ghazi Khan, Pakistan on Monday, Aug. 2, 2010. The government has deployed thousands of soldiers and civilian rescue workers to save an estimated 28,000 people trapped by the floodwaters, distribute food and collect the bodies of the victims. (AP Photo/Shiekh Saleem Raza)








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