Washington Landslide And Mudslide Killed 14

25 03 2014
The hillside which collapsed and produced a March 22, 2014 mudslide near Oso, Washington, is seen in this March 23, 2014 handout photo from Governor Jay Inslee's office.  REUTERS/Gov. Jay Inslee's Office/Handout

The hillside which collapsed and produced a March 22, 2014 mudslide near Oso, Washington, is seen in this March 23, 2014 handout photo from Governor Jay Inslee’s office.
REUTERS/Gov. Jay Inslee’s Office/Handout

By Tuesday, at least 14 people were killed, eight people were injured while 176 others are still missing  since a rain-soaked hillside collapsed on Saturday along State Route 530 near Oso, Washington.

The landslide heaved houses off their foundations, toppled trees and left a gaping cavity on what had been a tree-covered hillside.

More than 100 properties were hit by the mudslide. 

Seattle Times newspaper reported that many warnings had been issued about the area where the disaster.

In 1999, a report was filed to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers highlighting “the potential for a large catastrophic failure”.

Search crew workers were forced again to briefly retreat on Monday from the western edge of the slide area after movement was detected along a 1,500-foot (460-meter) stretch of earth.

There is fear of flooding as water levels rose behind a crude dam of mud and rubble that had been dumped into the North Fork of the Stillaguamish River by the slide in an area along State Route 530, about 55 miles northeast of Seattle, in the Pacific Northwest state.

Please click the photos for larger images:

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Aftermath of Great Mississippi River Flooding – Bonnet Carre Spillway Last Floodgate Is Closed In Pictures

24 06 2011

During the Mississippi River flooding, the US Army Corps of Engineers opened  floodgates of the Bonnet Carre Spillway and later the Morganza Spillway.

The Bonnet Carre Spillway was opened on May 9, to divert flood water from the Mississippi River into Lake Pontchartrain.

330 of the spillway’s 350 bays were opened before the corps started closing them on June 12.

The last 20 bays were closed on Monday.

On May 14, the Morganza floodway was opened to diverted water from the Mississippi into the Atchafalaya River, which carried it into the Gulf of Mexico.

It caused some flooding in the Atchafalaya Basin.

The number of gates opened on the Morganza peaked at 17.

Only one gate remained open as of Monday morning.

This two picture combo shows the Bonnet Carre Spillway, thirty miles upriver from New Orleans, on May 9, 2011, when it was opened to divert rising water from the Mississippi River into Lake Pontchartrain, left, and Monday, June 20, 2011, right, when the last bays were closed, in Norco, La. Corps officials don't think the Missouri River's flood is going to have significant impact on the lower Mississippi. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers workers close the final bays of the Bonnet Carre Spillway just above New Orleans in Norco, Miss., Monday, June 20, 2011. The gates were opened weeks ago, pouring fresh water into Lake Pontchartrain, as high water on the Mississippi River threatened levees. Corps officials don't think the Missouri River's flood is going to have significant impact on the lower Mississippi. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

Shore birds hunting for stranded fish fly over a formerly submerged roadway as U.S. Army Corps of Engineers workers close the final bays of the Bonnet Carre Spillway just above New Orleans in Norco, La., Monday, June 20, 2011. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

In this June 16, 2011 photograph this mailbox shows what two weeks under Mississippi River floodwaters can do, as residents of the affected areas begin their cleanup. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

In this June 16, 2011 photograph James Winters walks slowly through the sweltering remains of his Vicksburg, Miss., waterlogged home, wipes the sweat from his brow and ponders if his home of over 20 years, can be saved. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

In this June 16, 2011 photograph the sagging mold covered blades of this ceiling fan in the Vicksburg, Miss., home of James Winters shows the height the Mississippi River floodwaters reached as waters almost reached the roof of the home at its highest crest. (AP Photo/Holbrook Mohr)

The Mississippi River indicator on the new Mississippi River Bridge shows the height of the 2011 record flooding, Thursday, June 16, 2011 in Vicksburg, Miss. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)





Floodgate At The Morganza Spillway Is Now Opened – Pictures

15 05 2011

Before and after:

The Morganza Spillway, center, which allows water from the Mississippi River to divert into the Atchafalaya Basin when opened, is seen from the air in Morganza, La., Monday, May 9, 2011. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Water diverted from the Mississippi River spills through a bay in the Morganza Spillway in Morganza, La., Saturday, May 14, 2011. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

A floodgate at the Morganza Spillway was opened for the first time in nearly 4o years to divert the water from the flooded Mississippi River to the swamps of Louisiana’s Cajun country and then  into the Atchafalaya Basin.

The floodgate was last opened during the flood in 1973.

This is the first time three flood-control systems have been unlocked at the same time along the Mississippi River:

  1. On May 2, 2011, the US Army Corps of Engineers blew 2 huge holes in the Bird Point levee in Mississippi County, Missouri.

  2. About a week ago they opened a spillway northwest of New Orleans.

  3. May 14, 2011 a floodgate at the Morganza Spillway,  was opened.

As the gate was opened, the water rushed out very fast like a waterfall and spraying about 6 feet into the air.

Soon the dry land turned into a raging channel.

Lots of houses, buildings and farms in the area will soon be flooded.

It is very sad to see a man made disaster in order to avoid a bigger disaster in bigger cities as New Orleans.

Members with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers open the Morganza Spillway in Morganza, Louisiana May 14, 2011. Scores of U.S. heartland rivers from the Dakotas to Ohio have flooded following a snowy winter and heavy spring rains, feeding near-record crests on the lower Mississippi River. REUTERS/Sean Gardner

Members with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers open the Morganza Spillway in Morganza, Louisiana May 14, 2011. REUTERS/Sean Gardner

Water diverted from the Mississippi River spills through a bay in the Morganza Spillway in Morganza, La., Saturday, May 14, 2011. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Water diverted from the Mississippi River spills through a bay in the Morganza Spillway in Morganza, La., Saturday, May 14, 2011. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Water diverted from the Mississippi River spills through a bay in the Morganza Spillway in Morganza, La., Saturday, May 14, 2011. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Water diverted from the Mississippi River spills through a bay in the Morganza Spillway in Morganza, La., Saturday, May 14, 2011. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Related posts:

The Great Mississippi River Flooding – Will The Morganza Spillway Be Opened?

A Very Bad Flood Along The Mississippi River – Pictures

The Mississippi River crest Monday At Memphis?








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