Telremy, The Lost Kitten Part 2, By Ahmad Ali Karim

4 03 2014

Please click here for Telremy, The Lost Kitten Part 1, By Ahmad Ali Karim

Their father brought home some beautiful Japenese Furin wind chimes in the shape of small bells from Tokyo and they hang them around the veranda. The children were very excited to hear the beautiful sounds produced by the Furin wind chimes whenever the wind blows. Hamid took a green Furin wind chime and hang it on one of the bars of their door grill so that it will make a sound each time the door grill is opened.

His elder sister, Adlin looked at the green wind chime and she got an idea. She picked Telremy up and put the kitten on the grill just below the green bell. Then carefully Adlin pushed Telremy’s head to ring the bell. The clever kitten loved the sound of the Furin and it pushed its head towards the green bell again and again.

The next morning, when the children were having their breakfast, they heard the sound of the Furin from the door grill. Hamid went to the CCTV monitor to see who rang the bell. He saw Telremy on the grill, so it was the clever kitten that rang the bell. Isma opened the door and gave the cute little kitten some cat food and closed the front door.

‘TRRING’ ‘TRRING’ ‘TRRING’ ‘TRRING’, the bell rang again.

“Huh?” said the children, puzzled. Adlin opened the door and they saw the kitten ringing the bell.

“Ooh!” said Adlin in excitement, “Hi Telremy, you are a very clever kitten!”

“Telremy again?” asked Isma.

“Yup!” said Hamid as he peeked from behind Adlin’s shoulder.

The kids fed the hungry kitten and since then, the kitten would ring the bell when ever it wanted to eat or wanted to play with the children. Over the days, Telremy made friend with an orange cat named Apricot and since then, they played together everyday.

A few months passed and one night the family went out for dinner. As usual, Telremy excitedly ran after the children and they played with the kitten for a while before getting inside the car. They left the house after feeding the kitten.

It was very late when they reached home and everyone was sleepy. They were greeted only by Apricot, so the children looked for Telremy. 

“Maybe Telremy’s out somewhere, exploring or making new friends,” said Hamid.

Early the next morning, the children opened the door hoping to see the kitten sleeping in its box but Telremy was not there. Everybody was worried about Telremy. Isma checked the CCTV to see if Telremy had gone out earlier that morning before they went out looking for the kitten.

She saw Telremy playing with Apricot under the mango tree in front of their house just after they went out for dinner. Then the cat and the kitten chased each other until both were out of sight and Apricot only came home to greet the children after they reached home from the restaurant. But Telremy did not come home and that was the last time they saw the kitten.

Until today, nobody knows what had happened to Telremy, if the kitten is already dead or still alive, whether in captivity or was lost and could not find its way home. Everybody missed Telremy, the cute and clever little kitten and they missed hearing the kitten ringing the Furin.

~~~ The End ~~~

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Some Of World’s Weirdest Museums

11 02 2014

The Shin-Yokohama Raumen Museum in Tokyo is dedicated entirely to ramen, the Japanese noodle. It has an area that recreates Tokyo in 1958, the year in which instant noodles were created. There are plenty of ramen stands selling the tasty treat for peckish tourists to feast on. (Douglas P Perkins/ Wikimedia)

The Shin-Yokohama Raumen Museum in Tokyo is dedicated entirely to ramen, the Japanese noodle. It has an area that recreates Tokyo in 1958, the year in which instant noodles were created. There are plenty of ramen stands selling the tasty treat for peckish tourists to feast on. (Douglas P Perkins/ Wikimedia)

The Teapot Island in Maidstone, Kent, was created because the owner, Sue Blazye, found her ever-growing teapot collection outgrew her own home. The collection of nearly 7,000 teapots was of world record proportions in 2004, but it eventually lost its title in 2011 to man in China who apparently has 30,000 vessels. But, unlike Sue, the man from China doesn't provide cream teas if you visit.. (David Anstiss/ Wikimedia)

The Teapot Island in Maidstone, Kent, was created because the owner, Sue Blazye, found her ever-growing teapot collection outgrew her own home. The collection of nearly 7,000 teapots was of world record proportions in 2004, but it eventually lost its title in 2011 to man in China who apparently has 30,000 vessels. But, unlike Sue, the man from China doesn’t provide cream teas if you visit.. (David Anstiss/ Wikimedia)

The Museum of Bad Art in Boston, US, is the world's 'only museum dedicated to the collection, preservation, exhibition and celebration of bad art in all its forms', according to its website. The collection is made up of art found in charity shops, recovered from rubbish bins or even donated by artists themselves. This piece, called 'Mana Lisa', by A. Schmidt, was donated by the artist. (MOBA/Rex Features)

The Museum of Bad Art in Boston, US, is the world’s ‘only museum dedicated to the collection, preservation, exhibition and celebration of bad art in all its forms’, according to its website. The collection is made up of art found in charity shops, recovered from rubbish bins or even donated by artists themselves. This piece, called ‘Mana Lisa’, by A. Schmidt, was donated by the artist. (MOBA/Rex Features)

Have you ever wanted to see more than 20,000 sets of salt and pepper shakers? Course you have! This giant collection at The Salt and Pepper Shaker Museum in Gatilinburg, Tennessee, houses shakers in all shapes in sizes, including quirky panda figurines, cans of Coke and even shakers that look like nuts and bolts. The £1.80 admission ticket is a real bargain - especially as the money goes towards the cost for your own salt and pepper shaker that you can buy from the gift shop. Condiments to the curator! (AP Photo/Caryn Rousseau)

Have you ever wanted to see more than 20,000 sets of salt and pepper shakers? Course you have! This giant collection at The Salt and Pepper Shaker Museum in Gatilinburg, Tennessee, houses shakers in all shapes in sizes, including quirky panda figurines, cans of Coke and even shakers that look like nuts and bolts. The £1.80 admission ticket is a real bargain – especially as the money goes towards the cost for your own salt and pepper shaker that you can buy from the gift shop. Condiments to the curator! (AP Photo/Caryn Rousseau)

Is mustard your favourite condiment? If so, make sure you head to the Mustard Museum and Shop in Norwich. The town is the home of Colman's - finest purveyors of all things... mustardy. The manufacturer opened a dedicated tourist centre in the 1970s. The shop is a replica of a Victorian trade premises, complete with old fashioned tills. Learn about the history of Colman's mustard, and pick up something for dinner to boot! (Richard Gardner/REX)

Is mustard your favourite condiment? If so, make sure you head to the Mustard Museum and Shop in Norwich. The town is the home of Colman’s – finest purveyors of all things… mustardy. The manufacturer opened a dedicated tourist centre in the 1970s. The shop is a replica of a Victorian trade premises, complete with old fashioned tills. Learn about the history of Colman’s mustard, and pick up something for dinner to boot! (Richard Gardner/REX)

This is the world's longest coloured pencil - a whopping 7m-long. It is housed at the Cumberland Pencil Museum in Keswick, Cumbria, where the world's first pencil factory was opened in 1832. The museum allows tourists to delve into the history of pencils and offers colouring-in workshops for children. (Pencil Museum)

This is the world’s longest coloured pencil – a whopping 7m-long. It is housed at the Cumberland Pencil Museum in Keswick, Cumbria, where the world’s first pencil factory was opened in 1832. The museum allows tourists to delve into the history of pencils and offers colouring-in workshops for children. (Pencil Museum)

The British Lawnmower Museum in Southport, Merseyside, has more than 300 marvellous models - including one that belonged to Prince Charles and Diana! The collection features Edwardian and Victorian artefacts that herald way back to 1830, when the first lawnmower was developed by Englishman Edwin Beard Budding. (Lawnmower Museum)

The British Lawnmower Museum in Southport, Merseyside, has more than 300 marvellous models – including one that belonged to Prince Charles and Diana! The collection features Edwardian and Victorian artefacts that herald way back to 1830, when the first lawnmower was developed by Englishman Edwin Beard Budding. (Lawnmower Museum)





Photos: Heavy Snow Killed 7, Injured 1000 In Japan

9 02 2014

Snow storm hit Tokyo and some other part of Japan on Saturday.

Tokyo recorded the heaviest snow fall in 45 years, while Sendai recorded the heaviest snow fall in 78 years.

By late Saturday, 27 centimetres (10.6 inches) of snow was recorded in Tokyo and 35 centimetres (13.8 inches) of snow was recorded in Sendai.

Reports on Sunday said that at least seven people were dead and more than 1,000 people were injured across Japan.

Due to the heavy snow, hundreds of flights were cancelled.

NHK said that nearly 5,000 people were stranded at the Narita airport Saturday as traffic linking the airport to the capital was disrupted.

More than 20,000 households were without electricity on Sunday.

Japan Meteorological Agency expected more snowfalls in the northern part of the country on Sunday.

Please click the photos for larger images:





In Photos: Typhoon Wipha Hits Japan, 17 killed

16 10 2013

Typhoon Wipha strikes Japan’s pacific coast on Wednesday, killing at least 17 people while 50 others are still missing.

The typhoon caused flooding and mudslide that destroyed homes and other buildings.

Izu Oshima island, which is about 120 kilometers (75 miles) south of Tokyo was hardest hit by the disaster.

Police and firefighters were having difficulty getting to some stricken areas.

Here are the photos of the disaster…





10 Killed In Japan’s Hospital Fire

11 10 2013
Firefighters attempt to contain a fire at a hospital in Fukuoka Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Firefighters attempt to contain a fire at a hospital in Fukuoka Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Ten people were killed while eight others were injured during a fire at a four-story orthopedics hospital in Fukuoka, Japan on Friday.

Eight of the ones who were killed were the patients while the other two are the staff.

The Telegraph reported that the fire started at around 2:20am or 1720 GMT.

CNN reported that, “The fire at the orthopedics hospital started early in the morning and burned for roughly two and a half hours.”

The cause of the fire is not yet known.

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Photos: Typhoon Man-yi Strikes Japan Killing 2

17 09 2013

Typhoon Man-yi made a landfall at Toyohashi in Aichi prefecture, Japan just before eight o’clock on Monday morning or 2300 GMT Sunday.

The typhoon brought strong winds, high waves and heavy rains, damaging houses and flooding parts of Kyoto.

Yura River and Katsura River in Kyoto were overflowed and the Togetsu Bridge was partially-submerged.

Two people were killed by the disaster.

The typhoon forced the operator of the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant to release rainwater with low levels of radiation into the ocean.

According to the Japan Meteorological Agency, the typhoon has a sustained winds of up to 162 kilometres (100 miles) per hour.

Please click the photos for larger images:





Tokyo Will Be Hosting 2020 Olympics

9 09 2013
The International Olympic Committee is meeting in Buenos Aires to decide whether to award the 2020 Olympic Games to Madrid, Istanbul or Tokyo.

The International Olympic Committee is meeting in Buenos Aires to decide whether to award the 2020 Olympic Games to Madrid, Istanbul or Tokyo.

Tokyo will be hosting the 2020 Olympics!

Madrid and Istanbul lost in the Saturday’s voting by the International Olympic Committee in Buenos Aires.

Turkey is in a bad situation with the troubled Syria as its neighbour.

Anyway Tokyo has not yet solved the radiation leaking after the  Fukushima Nuclear Plant’s explosion on March 11, 2011.

So, Japan’s Prime Minister, Shinzo Abe promised an effective cleanup.

Congratulations to Japan for winning the vote for hosting the 2020 Olympics!








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