Photos: Rare Celestial Dance Of Jupiter, Venus And Mercury

This conjunction of Jupiter, Venus and Mercury was shot in Las Vegas with the Stratosphere in the foreground. (Photo by lybrand/ Credit to Yahoo News).
This conjunction of Jupiter, Venus and Mercury was shot in Las Vegas with the Stratosphere in the foreground. (Photo by lybrand/ Credit to Yahoo News).

At the end of May 2013,  Jupiter, Venus and Mercury form a celestial triangle in the night sky.

The three planets shine together in a triangle formation low in the western sky in a planetary meet-up known as a conjunction.

We can even see them with naked eyes if the sky is clear and the place is not too bright.

This cosmic show is so special spectacular because it includes the three brightest planets visible in the May night sky.

Venus is the brightest of the trio, with Jupiter a close second and Mercury coming in third.

Flickr photographers snapped awesome photos of this very rare and special event.

Please click the photos for larger images:

Northern Australian Total Solar Eclipse – The Last Until 2015

There will be a solar eclipse in parts of northern Australia for a few minutes from shortly after dawn Wednesday (Nov. 14) local time in Australia or 3:35 p.m. EST (2035 GMT) Tuesday.  

(Please click here for the photos of the total solar eclipse)

(Please click here for for the awesome video of the 2012 Australian Total Solar Eclipse)

This will be the world’s last solar eclipse until March 2015.

It could be seen in Northern Territory, state of Queensland and the Pacific Ocean.

If we are not in those places, we could still watch the rare phenomenon live from the Internet.

The Tourism Tropical North Queensland and the Slooh Space Camera will provide free webcasts of the event.

The broadcasts will begin at 1 p.m. EST (1800 GMT) and 2:30 p.m. EST (1930 GMT) on Tuesday, respectively. 

SPACE.com reported that:

The total eclipse of the sun will begin over the Arnhem Land region of the Northern Territory, where the moon’s shadow will touch down at 3:35 p.m. EST (2035 GMT). [Video: Watch Path of Nov. 13-14 Total Solar Eclipse]

Then the eclipse path moves southeast across the Gulf of Carpentaria to Queensland, darkening the skies over towns such as Mitchell River and Palmerville before reaching the coastal city of Cairns at 3:39 p.m. EST (2039 GMT).

Shortly after sunrise, skywatchers in Cairns will witness a total solar eclipse lasting two minutes.

From Cairns, the moon’s shadow will cruise out into the vast Pacific Ocean, with the total eclipsefinally petering out 610 miles (980 kilometers) west-northwest of Santiago, Chile, at 6:48 p.m. EST (2348 GMT).

The eclipse’s path of totality is about 108 miles (174 km) wide and covers 9,000 miles (14,500 km) over a three-hour period.

The next total solar eclipse occurs in March 2015 and will be visible from some areas in the North Atlantic region, such as Norway’s Svalbard Islands.

However, a so-called “hybrid” eclipse — which shifts between total and annular at different points on the globe — will come to parts of the Atlantic and central Africa in November 2013.

Related post:

  1. Awesome Video Of Australian 2012 Total Solar Eclipse By Panasonic, NASA

  2. Photos Of 2012 Australian Total Solar Eclipse

  3. The Sun

  4. Videos Of May, 2012 Spectacular Annular Solar Eclipse

  5. Photos – Rare Solar Eclipse In North America(May 20, 2012)

  6. Photos – Rare “Ring Of Fire” Solar Eclipse In Asia(May 21, 2012)

  7. Solar Eclipse July 2009

  8. My Picture In The Newspapers