Space Events Not To Be Missed In 2017

23 02 2017

(Yahoo News UK) – With a solar eclipse due on 26 February, there are plenty of celestial treats to keep stargazers happy in 2017.

Last year was packed with astronomical action including supermoons, Tim Peake’s history-making spacewalk and the arrival of NASA’s Juno probe at Jupiter and this year is set to be big just as big for space botherers. From meteor showers to solar eclipses, here are the space events you don’t want to miss in 2017…

  1. Annular solar eclipse – 26 February 2017
    At the end of February, the moon will pass in front of the sun, creating a bizarre halo effect. Unfortunately, this year’s eclipse will only be visible over South and West Africa and some of South America. 
  2. Jupiter at opposition – 7 April 2017
    The largest planet in our solar system will reach ‘opposition’ in April, meaning that it will slide into view as Earth moves into position between the sun and Jupiter. The massive planet’s face will be illuminated by the sun and will be visible through binoculars or a telescope. 
  3. Saturn at opposition – 15 June 2017
    In summer, Saturn will move into its closest position to Earth, giving us the best view possible. A telescope will be needed to see the huge planet’s famous rings while Saturn is fully lit up by the sun. 
  4. Perseid meteor shower – 12/13 August 2017
    One of the brighter meteor showers of the year, the Perseids happens annually between 17 July and 24 August, this year peaking 12-13 August. The best time to view the shooting stars is between midnight and dawn. 
  5. ‘Great American’ total solar eclipse – 21 August 2017
    For around two minutes, a 70-mile stretch between Oregon and South Carolina will be plunged into total darkness in a rare total eclipse as the sun will totally disappear behind the full moon. Stargazers elsewhere in the US will get a partial view of the stunning eclipse. 
  6. Cassini probe will crash into Saturn – 15 September 2017
    Launched in 1997, NASA’s probe finally made it to Saturn in 2004 and has been beaming back vital data to Earth ever since. The probe will be destroyed when it plunges through Jupiter’s atmosphere but not before sending back never-seen-before images. 
  7. Leonid meteor shower – 17/18 November 2017
    The Leonids meteors will be visible in the night sky throughout November, peaking between 17 and 18 November. The glowing pieces of comet debris will be visible to the naked eye. 
  8. Supermoon – 3 December 2017
    While 2016 saw stargazers treated to several supermoons, 2017 will see just one. December’s full moon, also known as the Full Cold Moon, will appear slightly bigger and brighter than normal. The best time to watch will be around sunset when the distinctive orange moon will appear.
  9. Geminid meteor shower – 13/14 December 2017
    Unlike most meteor showers, the Geminids are associated with an asteroid, rather than a comet. The glowing fireballs should be visible to the naked eye between December 7 and 16, but the best time to catch a glimpse is between 13 and 14 December. 




Our Solar System

13 06 2012

There used to be 9 planets and more than 170 moons in our solar system.

The 9 planets are Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune and Pluto.

But in August 2006, the International Astronomical Union decided to re-classify Pluto as a “dwarf planet”, and not in the same category as the 8 planets.

So now there are 8 planets in the solar system.

Each planet goes around the Sun on its own path called orbit.

Anyway we cannot see the paths because they are invisible.

Earth takes about 365 days to orbit the Sun.

This is called one Earth year.

And each moons moves around its planet in its own orbit.

The size of the planet from the smallest to the biggest:

  1. Mercury

  2. Mars

  3. Venus

  4. Earth

  5. Neptune

  6. Uranus

  7. Saturn

  8. Jupiter

On April 12, 1961, Yuri Alekseyevich Gagarin became the first person who went to space.

People travel to space in a spacecraft or spaceship.





Aliens in Jupiter 3

25 06 2010

Please click here for Aliens From Jupiter 2

Written and illustrated by: Ahmad Ali

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Kamosa's spaceship.

It was Kamosa’s spaceship! Kamosa left it on planet Earth the last time he went to Earth to visit his friends. Kamosa met Goplaga on planet Earth. Goplaga invited Kamosa to fly in his spaceship to Saturn. Then Kamosa’s human friends sent Kamosa’s spaceship from Earth to Saturn.

Kamosa's spaceship flying to Neptune from Saturn.

Kamosa invited Goplaga for a trip to Neptune. Over there Goplaga and Kamosa met the Neptune alien named Hilama. Hilama has two purple wings, light blue face and one red eye.

Hilama, the alien from Neptune.

Kamosa wanted to play the ‘4 players chess’, but Kamosa left the cheess set in Goplaga’s room on Saturn. Kamosa was very sad…

Goplaga heard his iPhone ringing.

The next day, Goplaga’s iPhone reminded him of Kamosa’s birthday. When Goplaga heard the reminder ringing, Goplaga rushed to Alien Express and bought another ‘4 players chess’ set.

Alien Express

To be continued in Aliens From Jupiter 4.





Aliens From Jupiter 2

23 06 2010

Please click here for Aliens From Jupiter 1.

Written and illustrated by: Ahmad Ali

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One day the alien Kamosa saw an alien from Saturn named Goplaga. Kamosa was an alien from Jupiter. The aliens from Saturn have 1000 tiny eyes, 300 feet and 10000 hands.

Left: Goplaga (the alien from Saturn). Right: A tree from Saturn. (Please click for a larger picture)

Goplaga invited Kamosa to visit Saturn. It was cold in Saturn and there were lots of blue purple trees. The aliens in Saturn were born from the trees.

Over there, Kamosa played 4 player chess with Goplaga. Goplaga controlled the blue and red pieces while Kamosa controlled the black and white pieces. When Kamosa and Goplaga finished playing chess, they heard a sound of a spaceship.

They saw a spaceship. (Click for a larger picture)

They went out and saw a spaceship from Planet Earth!

To be continued in Aliens From Jupiter 3.


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