Hungary Sludge Reservoir Could Collapse

Bus drivers wait beside their buses on a highway to pick up evacuees outside Kolontar, Hungary, Saturday, Oct. 9, 2010. The Hungarian town of Kolontar near the toxic red sludge reservoir that flooded the area and killed at least seven people is under evacuation over fears of a new leak of the dangerous heavy metal waste, officials said. (AP Photo/Bela Szandelszky)

I hope that this disaster will not happen again.

But the cracking wall of the alumina plant reservoir could collapse at any moment.

And the whole wall may collapse.

Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban told reporters that a crack in the concrete wall widened by 2.76 inches (7 centimeters) overnight.

Officials have started to build dams to the north so that it won’t hit too many people.

Kolontar has been evacuated.

And they may evacuate the next town of Devecser.

Both were hit by the red toxic flood on Monday.

If the wall collapse, it will be a great tragedy for Hungary.

An Ecological Disaster In Hungary

 

An aerial view of the red mud covering streets and neighborhood of Kolontar, 167 kms southwest of Budapest, Hungary, taken on Tuesday, Oct. 5, 2010, after the rupture of a red sludge reservoir at an alumina plant, in nearby Ajka, with over one million cubic meters of the poisonous chemical sludge inundating several villages. The flood of toxic mud killed killed a yet unknown number of people, injured more than one hundred, with some people still missing. (AP Photo/MTI, Gyoergy Varga)

On Monday, a gigantic sludge reservoir burst its banks at an alumina plant in Ajka, Hungary caused a bad red sludge flood.

An aerial photo taken Tuesday, Oct. 5, 2010 shows the ruptured wall of a red sludge reservoir of the Ajkai Timfoldgyar plant in Kolontar, 100 miles (160 kilometers) southwest of Budapest, Hungary. The government declared a state of emergency in three counties affected by the flooding. (AP Photos/MTI, Gyoergy Varga)

 

Ajka is a town 100 miles (160 kilometers) southwest of Budapest, the capital of Hungary.

By Tuesday, it was reported that about 35.3 million cubic feet of sludge had poured from the reservoir, flooding a 16 square mile area.

An aerial view shows overturned cars in the red sludge yard of a house in Kolontar, 167 kms southwest of Budapest, Hungary, taken on Tuesday, Oct. 5, 2010. (AP Photo/MTI, Gyoergy Varga)

 

The red sludge is dangerous because the material is a waste product in aluminum production that contains heavy metals and is toxic if ingested.

At least four people were killed, six were missing and 120 injured, many with burns.

Hundreds were evacuated.

In Kolontar, the town closest to the plant, a 12-foot-high wave of red slurry hit, swept away everything in its path.

A villager checks his yard flooded by toxic mud in the Kolontar, Hungary, Tuesday, Oct. 5, 2010. (AP Photo/Bela Szandelszky)

 

Houses were flooded, cars were swept off and bridges were damaged.

By Tuesday, it swept toward the Danube River.

It will be an ecological disaster if it reach the Danube River.

Emergency workers wearing masks and chemical protection gear rushed to pour 1,000 tons of plaster into the Marcal River to bind the sludge and keep it from flowing on to the Danube some 45 miles away.

I think we should stop making aluminium because this disaster can happen again and again.

The disaster kills people. animals, plants and trees.

We must stop polluting our Earth!

Go green!

Logs carried in by the flooding toxic mud cover a yard in the town of Devecser, Hungary, Tuesday, Oct. 5, 2010. Monday's flooding was caused by the rupture of a red sludge reservoir at an alumina plant in western Hungary and has affected seven towns near the Ajkai Timfoldgyar plant in the town of Ajka, 100 miles (160 kilometers) southwest of Budapest. (AP Photo/Bela Szandelszky)

 

A grain field is flooded by toxic mud outside the village of Kolontar, Hungary, Tuesday, Oct. 5, 2010. (AP Photo/Bela Szandelszky)

 

A rescue worker clearing the flooded village of Devecser, Hungary, October 5, 2010. REUTERS/Bernadett Szabo.

 

A resident stands in his flooded garden in the village of Kolontar 150km (93.2 miles) west of Budapest October 4, 2010.(REUTERS/Bernadett Szabo)

 

Local residents are rescued by excavators in Devecser, 164 kms southwest of Budapest, Hungary, Monday, Oct. 4, 2010. Three people are missing. (AP Photo/MTI, Lajos Nagy)

 

China Flooding Kills 701 In Worst Toll In A Decade-Photos

There is a bad flood in China now.

It is a disaster.

701 people were killed by the flood and 347 are missing.

Three quarter of China’s provinces were hit by the flood.

25 rivers have reached record-high water level.

Heavy rain on the hillsides caused lots of landslides.

Lots and lots of houses and buildings were damaged.

The water level at the Three Gorges Dam is at record high.

It is now just 20m below the dam’s maximum capacity.

Three Gorges Dam is the biggest hydro power dam in the world.

The dam is on the Yangtze River.

Yangtze River is the longest river in China.

I think that the people in China must stop doing things that hurt the environment.

They should stop cutting down trees and stop polluting the rivers and the air.

All these make a flood worse.

For more news on flood in China, please click here- ‘China Hit By Typhoon Chanthu-Pictures’.

We have to take care of our Earth as in Micheal Jackson’s ‘Earth Song’.

(100720) -- YICHANG, July 20, 2010 (Xinhua) -- Flood waters are sluiced with the water outflux monitored at 40,000 cubic meters per second at Three Gorges Dam in Yichang, central China's Hubei Province, July 20, 2010. China's Three Gorges Dam project on the Yangtze River stood its biggest flood-control test at 8 a.m. Tuesday since completion, as the flow on the river's upper reaches topped 70,000 cubic meters a second. All ferry services were halted at the Three Gorges Dam on Monday, and would be resumed after the influx decreased to 45,000 cubic meters per second. (Xinhua/Cheng Min) (zgp)
(100720) -- YICHANG, July 20, 2010 (Xinhua) -- Flood waters are sluiced at the Three Gorges Dam, China. (Xinhua/Cheng Min) (zgp)

(100720) -- YICHANG, July 20, 2010 (Xinhua) -- Journalists take photos of the scene of flood discharge at Three Gorges Dam, July 20, 2010. (Xinhua/Cheng Min) (zgp)
The Three Gorges Dam discharges water to lower the level in a reservoir, July 19, 2010.( Reuters/ Stringer)
The Three Gorges Dam discharges water to lower the level in a reservoir, July 19, 2010.( Reuters/ Stringer)
Flood water is released from the Three Gorges Dam's floodgates in Yichang, in central China's Hubei province, Tuesday, July 20, 2010. Rescuers in China were searching Tuesday for 30 people buried in landslides as flood waters from days of heavy rain surged past the Three Gorges Dam, the world's largest. (AP Photo) ** CHINA OUT **
In this photo taken Tuesday, July 13, 2010, rescue workers evacuate villagers trapped by flood waters in Anqing in central China's Anhui province. Parts of China experience annual flooding but this year's rains have been particularly devastating. Storms so far this month have caused economic losses of 22.2 billion yuan ($3.3 billion), the Ministry of Civil Affairs said on its website on Wednesday.(AP Photo)**CHINA OUT**
In this Monday, July 12, 2010 photo, electric poles are damaged and a bulldozer washed away by flood in Tongcheng, in central China's Anhui province. Landslides slammed into three mountain hamlets in western China early Tuesday, killing 17 people and leaving 44 missing, while crews drained a fast-rising reservoir in another part of the country following heavy rains. (AP Photo) ** CHINA OUT **
Chinese rescuers arrive in the flooded Chongqing Municipality. (AFP/AFP)