Photos: Blizzard Struck Massachusetts And New England (2015)

Water floods a street on the coast in Scituate, Mass., Tuesday, Jan. 27, 2015. A storm packing blizzard conditions spun up the East Coast early Tuesday, pounding parts of coastal New Jersey northward through Maine with high winds and heavy snow. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer)
Water floods a street on the coast in Scituate, Mass., Tuesday, Jan. 27, 2015. A storm packing blizzard conditions spun up the East Coast early Tuesday, pounding parts of coastal New Jersey northward through Maine with high winds and heavy snow. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer)

A powerful blizzard struck Boston and surrounding New England on Tuesday, bringing as much as three feet of snow and causing coastal flooding.

High tides breached a seawall in Marshfield, about 30 miles (50 km) south of Boston, damaging 11 homes.

Snow was forecast to keep falling into early Wednesday in eastern New England, possibly setting a record snowfall in Boston.

The heaviest snowfall was recorded outside Boston, with 36 inches (91.4 cm) in Lunenburg, Massachusetts, and 35 inches (88.9 cm) reported in Auburn, according to the National Weather Service.

In Photos: Northeast Blizzard Now And Then

1940: During one of the worst blizzards in New England history, the heart of Boston's shopping district is shut down. (AP Photo/Abe Fox)
1940: During one of the worst blizzards in New England history, the heart of Boston’s shopping district is shut down. (AP Photo/Abe Fox) Please click the photo for larger image.

Please click here for more photos:

After Sandy, A New Storm May Hit Mid-Atlantic And New England

The National Weather Service’s Prediction Center issued a warning for a possible nor’easter, which may hit the Mid-Atlantic and New England regions as early as next Tuesday.

The storm will bring moderate rains and gusty winds in many of the same areas ravaged by the superstorm.

It is not a big storm like Hurricane Sandy but it may cause more problems for both New York and New Jersey.

Related posts:

  1. NASA’s Before And After Photos Of New Jersey Coastline

  2. Superstorm Sandy: Before And After Photos

  3. Superstorm Sandy’s Extremes Facts

  4. In Photos: Mass Transit Damaged By Superstorm Sandy

  5. Photos: Superstorm Sandy Aftermath

  6. Photos: Sandy Causes Blizzards In Appalachia

  7. Photos: NYC Subways Flooded By Hurricane Sandy

  8. Photos: Fire And Water Destroyed Homes In NYC’s Queens Breezy Point And Belle Harbor

  9. At Least 50 Houses Flooded By Sandy Destroyed By NYC Fire

  10. In Picture: Superstorm Sandy Slams New Jersey Coast, Sends 13 Feet Surge In NYC

  11. Photos: Eastern US Braces For Superstorm Sandy

  12. Sandy: The Largest Storm To Hit The US?

  13. Photos: Hurricane Sandy Left Bahamas, 43 Killed In Caribbean

  14. Hurricane Sandy Pounds Jamaica

Photos: Eastern US Braces For Superstorm Sandy

A news crew wades through sea foam blown onto Jeanette’s Pier in Nags Head, N.C., Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012 as wind and rain from Hurricane Sandy move into the area. Governors from North Carolina, where steady rains were whipped by gusting winds Saturday night, to Connecticut declared states of emergency. Delaware ordered mandatory evacuations for coastal communities by 8 p.m. Sunday. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)

According to the  National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Sandy could be the largest storm to hit the United States.

Tens of millions of East Coast residents are preparing themselves for the monster storm. 

New York and other big cities closed their transit systems and schools and ordered residents of low-lying areas to evacuate.

The New York Stock Exchange will close its trading floor on Monday for the first time since Hurricane Gloria in 1985.

High winds blow sea foam into the air as a person walks across Jeanette’s Pier in Nags Head, N.C., Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012, as wind and rain from Hurricane Sandy move into the area. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)
Storm waves from Hurricane Sandy in Ocean City, New Jersey, October 28, 2012. The popular boardwalk in this resort town has dozens of businesses facing the ocean and is expected to get the full brunt of the storm when it hits land sometime Monday. Hurricane Sandy could be the biggest storm to hit the United States mainland when it comes ashore on Monday night, bringing strong winds and dangerous flooding to the East Coast from the mid-Atlantic states to New England, forecasters said on Sunday. REUTERS/Tom Mihalek
Ocean water rolls over state highway NC 12 in Buxton, N.C., on Hatteras Island at dawn on Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012, as Hurricane Sandy works its way north, battering the U.S. East Coast. (AP Photo/The Virginian-Pilot, Steve Earley)
New York Stock Exchange workers place sand bags in front of doors and over electrical vaults at the exchange in New York October 28, 2012. The New York Stock Exchange placed sand bags around the perimeter of the building and announced they will close on Monday in preparation for the arrival of Hurricane Sandy. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Utilities and state road workers monitor the situation on Virginia Dare Trail as rain and wind from Hurricane Sandy engulf the beachfront road in Kill Devil Hills, N.C., Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012. Tens of thousands of people were ordered to evacuate coastal areas Sunday as big cities and small towns across the U.S. Northeast braced for the onslaught of a superstorm threatening some 60 million people along the most heavily populated corridor in the nation. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)
Police make a final sweep of the subway at Times Square in New York October 28, 2012. Hurricane Sandy, which could become the largest storm ever to hit the U.S., is set to bring much of the East Coast, including New York and Washington, to a virtual standstill in the next few days with battering winds, flooding and the risk of widespread power outages. New York and other cities and towns closed their transit systems and schools and ordered residents of low-lying areas to evacuate before a storm surge that could reach as high as 11 feet (3.4 meters). REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
A Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) employee tapes off the turnstiles to bar access to the subway in New York October 28, 2012. Hurricane Sandy, which could become the largest storm ever to hit the U.S., is set to bring much of the East Coast, including New York and Washington, to a virtual standstill in the next few days with battering winds, flooding and the risk of widespread power outages. New York and other cities and towns closed their transit systems and schools and ordered residents of low-lying areas to evacuate before a storm surge that could reach as high as 11 feet (3.4 meters). REUTERS/Carlo Allegri

Related post:

  1. NASA’s Before And After Photos Of New Jersey Coastline

  2. Superstorm Sandy: Before And After Photos

  1. In Photos: Mass Transit Damaged By Superstorm Sandy

  2. Photos: Superstorm Sandy Aftermath

  3. Photos: Sandy Causes Blizzards In Appalachia

  4. Photos: Fire And Water Destroyed Homes In NYC’s Queens Breezy Point And Belle Harbor

  5. At Least 50 Houses Flooded By Sandy Destroyed By NYC Fire

  6. In Picture: Superstorm Sandy Slams New Jersey Coast, Sends 13 Feet Surge In NYC

  7. Photos: Eastern US Braces For Superstorm Sandy

  8. Sandy: The Largest Storm To Hit The US?

  9. Photos: Hurricane Sandy Left Bahamas, 43 Killed In Caribbean

  10. Hurricane Sandy Pounds Jamaica

Hurricane Irene Pounds The Bahamas – Photos

(Please click here for the latest photos of Hurricane Irene pounding the US East Coast).

As of 8 a.m. EDT Thursday, the Category 3 Hurricane Irene was centered about 65 miles (105 kilometers) east-northeast of Nassau in the Bahamas.

Early Thursday, the storm was thrashing the Bahamas with widespread damage reported on at least two southern islands, the Acklins and Crooked islands >>>please click here<<<.

Now the monstrous Hurricane Irene is heading to the US East Coast Seaboard  threatening 65 million people along a shore-hugging path from North Carolina to New England.

A man walks along a seaside park as Hurricane Irene passes to the east of Nassau on New Providence Island in the Bahamas, Thursday Aug. 25, 2011. Irene is pounding the Bahamas as a Category 3 hurricane. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)
A man walks along the waterfront as Hurricane Irene passes to the east of Nassau on New Providence Island in the Bahamas, Thursday Aug. 25, 2011. Irene is pounding the Bahamas as a Category 3 hurricane. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)
Residents Ash Henderson, right, and Ioana walk past a downed tree in their neighborhood as Hurricane Irene passes to the east of Nassau on New Providence Island in the Bahamas, Thursday Aug. 25, 2011. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)
A man stops to photograph a downed utility pole as Hurricane Irene passes to the east of Nassau on New Providence Island in the Bahamas, Thursday Aug. 25, 2011. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)
Hurricane Irene downed trees as it passed through Thursday, Aug. 25, 2011, to the east of Nassau on New Providence Island in the Bahamas. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)
A truck drives through a deserted downtown as Hurricane Irene passes to the east of Nassau, on New Providence Island in the Bahamas, Thursday, Aug. 25, 2011. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)

Pictures-US East Coast Prepares For Hurricane Earl

Jay Farley, top, installs covers to a homeowner's oceanfront window as Jason Wheeler, bottom, looks on as Hurricane Earl heads toward the eastern coast in Atlantic Beach, N.C., Wednesday, Sept. 1, 2010. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)

Will Hurricane Earl hit the USA?

If it does, it is going to be disaster because Earl is a powerful Category 4 storm.

People disembark from the ferry at Swan Quarter, N.C. after being evacuated from Ocracoke Island as Hurricane Earl approaches the Outer Banks on Sept. 1, 2010. CHRIS SEWARD - cseward@newsobserver.com

Tourist started to evacuate Hatteras Island and Ocracoke Island and tourists were largely gone from North Carolina’s Outer Banks.

A ferry leaving Hatteras, N.C., Wednesday, Sept. 1, 2010. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)

The governors of North Carolina, Virginia and Maryland declared states of emergency.

Emergency officials on Cape Cod braced for their first major storm since

Bob brought winds of up to 100 mph to coastal New England in August 1991.

Preparing for the Category 4 storm  as Hurricane Earl heads toward the eastern coast in Atlantic Beach, N.C., Wednesday, Sept. 1, 2010. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)
Preparing for the Category 4 storm as Hurricane Earl heads toward the eastern coast in Atlantic Beach, N.C., Wednesday, Sept. 1, 2010. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)
Surfing in Avon, N.C., Wednesday, Sept. 1, 2010. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)
People prepare to leave a vacation rental house in Avon, N.C., Wednesday, Sept. 1, 2010. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)
People prepare to leave a vacation rental house in Avon, N.C., Wednesday, Sept. 1, 2010. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)