New York City Subway Train Derails, 19 Injured

3 05 2014
New York City emergency crews converge at 60th Street and Broadway to evacuate passengers from a subway train after it derailed in the Queens borough of New York, Friday, May 2, 2014. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)

New York City emergency crews converge at 60th Street and Broadway to evacuate passengers from a subway train after it derailed in the Queens borough of New York, Friday, May 2, 2014. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)

A New York City subway train carrying 1,000 people derailed on Friday morning while traveling through a tunnel in the borough of Queens.

19 people were injured in the 10:24 a.m. incident.

It involved six cars in an eight-car Manhattan-bound ‘F’ line subway.

MTA Chairman Thomas Prendergast said that the mass-transit agency will begin a full inspection of signals and tracks to investigate the cause of the derailment.

New York City firefighters emerge from a hatch in the sidewalk at 60th Street and Broadway after evacuating passengers from a subway train that derailed in the Queens borough of New York, Friday, May 2, 2014.(AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)

New York City firefighters emerge from a hatch in the sidewalk at 60th Street and Broadway after evacuating passengers from a subway train that derailed in the Queens borough of New York, Friday, May 2, 2014.(AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)

New York City firefighters and Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) workers attend an emergency during a derailed F train in Woodside, New York, May 2, 2014. A New York City subway train carrying 1,000 riders derailed on Friday morning while traveling through a tunnel in the borough of Queens, injuring 19 people, city fire officials said. Fifteen people escaped with minor injuries while four more were transported to a hospital with potentially serious injuries, officials said. (REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz)

New York City firefighters and Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) workers attend an emergency during a derailed F train in Woodside, New York, May 2, 2014. A New York City subway train carrying 1,000 riders derailed on Friday morning while traveling through a tunnel in the borough of Queens, injuring 19 people, city fire officials said. Fifteen people escaped with minor injuries while four more were transported to a hospital with potentially serious injuries, officials said. (REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz)

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Photos: 4 People Killed After Metro North Train Derails In NYC

2 12 2013

A Metro North train derailed along the Hudson River, about 100 feet north of the Spuyten Duyvil station in the Bronx early Sunday.

Four people were killed while sixty-three others were injured in the accident.

The train was travelling to the New York’s Grand Central Station from Poughkeepsie, New York.

Yahoo News reported that Aaron Donovan, a spokesman for the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA), said that the derailment occurred at approximately 7:20 a.m.

In the tragic incident, five of the train’s seven cars were derailed, but none went into the Hudson River.

It is reported that the MTA identified the victims as 54-year-old Donna L. Smith of Newburgh; 58-year-old James G. Lovell of Cold Spring; 59-year-old James M. Ferrari of Montrose; and 35-year-old Ahn Kisook of Queens.

Please click the photos for larger images.





In Photos: Mass Transit Damaged By Superstorm Sandy

1 11 2012

Superstorm Sandy had caused huge damages to all of the mass transit systems especially in New York City and New Jersey.

The New York City’s subway system will be reopened on Thursday but it will be offering only limited services.

Please click here for:  Photos: NYC Subways Flooded By Hurricane Sandy.

The subways:

The South Ferry Whitehall St. subway exit in the financial district of Manhattan is shown in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy in this still image taken from video released by New York Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA), in New York, October 30, 2012. One of the biggest questions now is who will pay for the extensive damage to municipal infrastructure, subway tunnels, train tracks, electrical transformers, coastal boardwalks and piers, that Sandy left behind along the East Coast. REUTERS/MTA /Handout

The South Ferry Whitehall St. subway entrance in the financial district of Manhattan is shown in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy in this still image taken from video released by New York Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA), in New York, October 30, 2012. REUTERS/MTA /Handout

Employees from MTA New York City Transit worked to restore the South Ferry subway station after it was flooded by seawater during Hurricane Sandy. Photo: Metropolitan Transportation Authority / Patrick Cashin.

This Oct. 30, 2012, photo provided by New York’s Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) shows a flooded escalator in the South Ferry station of the No. 1 subway line, in lower Manhattan, after Superstorm Sandy passed through New York. Floodwaters that poured into New York’s deepest subway tunnels may pose the biggest obstacle to the city’s recovery from the worst natural disaster in the transit system’s 108-year history but on Wednesday Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced limited subway service will resume on Thursday. (AP Photo/Metropolitan Transportation Authority)

The railroads:

Damage on the New York City Subway’s Rockaway Line (A train). Photo: MTA New York City Transit / Leonard Wiggins

Damage on the New York City Subway’s Rockaway Line (A train). Photo: MTA New York City Transit / Leonard Wiggins

Flooding at Metro-North’s Harmon Yard on the Hudson Line. Photo: MTA Long Island Rail Road.

Flooding and damage to Metro-North’s system — in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy — to the bridge and south yard at Harmon. Photo: MTA New York City Transit

Flood waters entered the Long Island Rail Road’s West Side Yard. All trains had been removed from the yard prior to the arrival of the storm. Photo: MTA Long Island Rail Road.

Flood waters entered the Long Island Rail Road’s West Side Yard. All trains had been removed from the yard prior to the arrival of the storm. Photo: MTA Long Island Rail Road.

The busses and taxis:

Water reaches the street level of the Battery Park Underpass, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in New York. Sandy arrived along the East Coast and morphed into a huge and problematic system, putting more than 7.5 million homes and businesses in the dark and causing a number of deaths. (AP Photo/Louis Lanzano)

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo toured the Hugh L. Carey Tunnel (formerly known as the Brooklyn Battery Tunnel) on Oct. 30, 2012, with MTA Chairman and CEO Joseph J. Lhota and Jim Ferrara, President of MTA Bridges and Tunnels. The tunnel flooded during Hurricane Sandy. Photo: Metropolitan Transportation Authority / Patrick Cashin.

Taxis are submerged in floodwaters in the wake of superstorm Sandy on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Weehawken, N.J. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Mike Groll)

A parking lot full of yellow cabs is flooded as a result of superstorm Sandy on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012 in Hoboken, NJ. (AP Photo/Charles Sykes)

Related Post:

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  2. Superstorm Sandy: Before And After Photos

  1. After Sandy, A New Storm May Hit Mid-Atlantic And New England

  2. Photos: Superstorm Sandy Aftermath

  3. Photos: Sandy Causes Blizzards In Appalachia

  4. Photos: NYC Subways Flooded By Hurricane Sandy

  5. Photos: Fire And Water Destroyed Homes In NYC’s Queens Breezy Point And Belle Harbor

  6. At Least 50 Houses Flooded By Sandy Destroyed By NYC Fire

  7. In Picture: Superstorm Sandy Slams New Jersey Coast, Sends 13 Feet Surge In NYC

  8. Photos: Eastern US Braces For Superstorm Sandy

  9. Sandy: The Largest Storm To Hit The US?

  10. Photos: Hurricane Sandy Left Bahamas, 43 Killed In Caribbean

  11. Hurricane Sandy Pounds Jamaica





Photos: NYC Subways Flooded By Hurricane Sandy

31 10 2012

A man uses his mobile phone to photograph a closed and flooded subway station in lower Manhattan, in New York, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. Due to superstorm Sandy, New York City awakened Tuesday to a flooded subway system, shuttered financial markets and hundreds of thousands of people without power a day after a wall of seawater and high winds slammed into the city, destroying buildings and flooding tunnels. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

The subway tunnels were flooded as Hurricane Sandy pounded New York City. 

The flood caused lots of problems to the transit system.

>>>Please click here for; In Photos: Mass Transit Damaged By Superstorm Sandy<<<

Critical electrical equipment could be ruined.

Track beds could be covered with debris.

Corrosive salt water could have destroyed essential switches, lights, turnstiles and the power-conducting third rail.

This is the worst natural disaster in the New york City subway’s 108-year history.

On Tuesday, some of the tunnels that carry cars and subway trains beneath New York City’s East River are still flooded.

The head of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority said it was too early to tell how long it would take to pump them dry and make repairs.

Mayor Michael Bloomberg guessed it could take four days for train service to resume.

Sandbags block the entrance to the closed South Ferry/Whitehall Street subway station in Battery Park, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in New York. Sandy arrived along the East Coast and morphed into a huge and problematic system, putting more than 7.5 million homes and businesses in the dark and causing a number of deaths. (AP Photo/Louis Lanzano)

The South Ferry subway station entrance in Lower Manhattan in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy is seen in this handout photo from the MTA, in New York, October 30, 2012. One of the biggest questions now is who will pay for the extensive damage to municipal infrastructure, subway tunnels, train tracks, electrical transformers, coastal boardwalks and piers, that Sandy left behind along the East Coast. REUTERS/MTA Long Island Rail Road/Handout FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS. THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. IT IS DISTRIBUTED, EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS

Flooding from superstorm Sandy has forced the closure of the New York City subway system. At the Whitehall and South Ferry station, flood waters in an adjoining shopping promenade threatened to collapse a wall separating the two areas. (Oct. 30)

Floodwaters from Hurricane Sandy rush into the Port Authority Trans-Hudson’s (PATH) Hoboken, New Jersey station through an elevator shaft in this video frame grab from the NY/NJ Port Authority twitter feed October 29, 2012. REUTERS/NY/NJ Port Authority/Twitter

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  1. After Sandy, A New Storm May Hit Mid-Atlantic And New England

  2. In Photos: Mass Transit Damaged By Superstorm Sandy

  3. Photos: Superstorm Sandy Aftermath

  4. Photos: Sandy Causes Blizzards In Appalachia

  5. Photos: Fire And Water Destroyed Homes In NYC’s Queens Breezy Point And Belle Harbor

  6. At Least 50 Houses Flooded By Sandy Destroyed By NYC Fire

  7. In Picture: Superstorm Sandy Slams New Jersey Coast, Sends 13 Feet Surge In NYC

  8. Photos: Eastern US Braces For Superstorm Sandy

  9. Sandy: The Largest Storm To Hit The US?

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  11. Hurricane Sandy Pounds Jamaica





Photos: Eastern US Braces For Superstorm Sandy

29 10 2012

A news crew wades through sea foam blown onto Jeanette’s Pier in Nags Head, N.C., Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012 as wind and rain from Hurricane Sandy move into the area. Governors from North Carolina, where steady rains were whipped by gusting winds Saturday night, to Connecticut declared states of emergency. Delaware ordered mandatory evacuations for coastal communities by 8 p.m. Sunday. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)

According to the  National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Sandy could be the largest storm to hit the United States.

Tens of millions of East Coast residents are preparing themselves for the monster storm. 

New York and other big cities closed their transit systems and schools and ordered residents of low-lying areas to evacuate.

The New York Stock Exchange will close its trading floor on Monday for the first time since Hurricane Gloria in 1985.

High winds blow sea foam into the air as a person walks across Jeanette’s Pier in Nags Head, N.C., Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012, as wind and rain from Hurricane Sandy move into the area. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)

Storm waves from Hurricane Sandy in Ocean City, New Jersey, October 28, 2012. The popular boardwalk in this resort town has dozens of businesses facing the ocean and is expected to get the full brunt of the storm when it hits land sometime Monday. Hurricane Sandy could be the biggest storm to hit the United States mainland when it comes ashore on Monday night, bringing strong winds and dangerous flooding to the East Coast from the mid-Atlantic states to New England, forecasters said on Sunday. REUTERS/Tom Mihalek

Ocean water rolls over state highway NC 12 in Buxton, N.C., on Hatteras Island at dawn on Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012, as Hurricane Sandy works its way north, battering the U.S. East Coast. (AP Photo/The Virginian-Pilot, Steve Earley)

New York Stock Exchange workers place sand bags in front of doors and over electrical vaults at the exchange in New York October 28, 2012. The New York Stock Exchange placed sand bags around the perimeter of the building and announced they will close on Monday in preparation for the arrival of Hurricane Sandy. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri

Utilities and state road workers monitor the situation on Virginia Dare Trail as rain and wind from Hurricane Sandy engulf the beachfront road in Kill Devil Hills, N.C., Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012. Tens of thousands of people were ordered to evacuate coastal areas Sunday as big cities and small towns across the U.S. Northeast braced for the onslaught of a superstorm threatening some 60 million people along the most heavily populated corridor in the nation. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)

Police make a final sweep of the subway at Times Square in New York October 28, 2012. Hurricane Sandy, which could become the largest storm ever to hit the U.S., is set to bring much of the East Coast, including New York and Washington, to a virtual standstill in the next few days with battering winds, flooding and the risk of widespread power outages. New York and other cities and towns closed their transit systems and schools and ordered residents of low-lying areas to evacuate before a storm surge that could reach as high as 11 feet (3.4 meters). REUTERS/Carlo Allegri

A Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) employee tapes off the turnstiles to bar access to the subway in New York October 28, 2012. Hurricane Sandy, which could become the largest storm ever to hit the U.S., is set to bring much of the East Coast, including New York and Washington, to a virtual standstill in the next few days with battering winds, flooding and the risk of widespread power outages. New York and other cities and towns closed their transit systems and schools and ordered residents of low-lying areas to evacuate before a storm surge that could reach as high as 11 feet (3.4 meters). REUTERS/Carlo Allegri

Related post:

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  2. Superstorm Sandy: Before And After Photos

  1. In Photos: Mass Transit Damaged By Superstorm Sandy

  2. Photos: Superstorm Sandy Aftermath

  3. Photos: Sandy Causes Blizzards In Appalachia

  4. Photos: Fire And Water Destroyed Homes In NYC’s Queens Breezy Point And Belle Harbor

  5. At Least 50 Houses Flooded By Sandy Destroyed By NYC Fire

  6. In Picture: Superstorm Sandy Slams New Jersey Coast, Sends 13 Feet Surge In NYC

  7. Photos: Eastern US Braces For Superstorm Sandy

  8. Sandy: The Largest Storm To Hit The US?

  9. Photos: Hurricane Sandy Left Bahamas, 43 Killed In Caribbean

  10. Hurricane Sandy Pounds Jamaica








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