Photos: Eastern US Braces For Superstorm Sandy

A news crew wades through sea foam blown onto Jeanette’s Pier in Nags Head, N.C., Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012 as wind and rain from Hurricane Sandy move into the area. Governors from North Carolina, where steady rains were whipped by gusting winds Saturday night, to Connecticut declared states of emergency. Delaware ordered mandatory evacuations for coastal communities by 8 p.m. Sunday. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)

According to the  National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Sandy could be the largest storm to hit the United States.

Tens of millions of East Coast residents are preparing themselves for the monster storm. 

New York and other big cities closed their transit systems and schools and ordered residents of low-lying areas to evacuate.

The New York Stock Exchange will close its trading floor on Monday for the first time since Hurricane Gloria in 1985.

High winds blow sea foam into the air as a person walks across Jeanette’s Pier in Nags Head, N.C., Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012, as wind and rain from Hurricane Sandy move into the area. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)
Storm waves from Hurricane Sandy in Ocean City, New Jersey, October 28, 2012. The popular boardwalk in this resort town has dozens of businesses facing the ocean and is expected to get the full brunt of the storm when it hits land sometime Monday. Hurricane Sandy could be the biggest storm to hit the United States mainland when it comes ashore on Monday night, bringing strong winds and dangerous flooding to the East Coast from the mid-Atlantic states to New England, forecasters said on Sunday. REUTERS/Tom Mihalek
Ocean water rolls over state highway NC 12 in Buxton, N.C., on Hatteras Island at dawn on Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012, as Hurricane Sandy works its way north, battering the U.S. East Coast. (AP Photo/The Virginian-Pilot, Steve Earley)
New York Stock Exchange workers place sand bags in front of doors and over electrical vaults at the exchange in New York October 28, 2012. The New York Stock Exchange placed sand bags around the perimeter of the building and announced they will close on Monday in preparation for the arrival of Hurricane Sandy. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Utilities and state road workers monitor the situation on Virginia Dare Trail as rain and wind from Hurricane Sandy engulf the beachfront road in Kill Devil Hills, N.C., Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012. Tens of thousands of people were ordered to evacuate coastal areas Sunday as big cities and small towns across the U.S. Northeast braced for the onslaught of a superstorm threatening some 60 million people along the most heavily populated corridor in the nation. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)
Police make a final sweep of the subway at Times Square in New York October 28, 2012. Hurricane Sandy, which could become the largest storm ever to hit the U.S., is set to bring much of the East Coast, including New York and Washington, to a virtual standstill in the next few days with battering winds, flooding and the risk of widespread power outages. New York and other cities and towns closed their transit systems and schools and ordered residents of low-lying areas to evacuate before a storm surge that could reach as high as 11 feet (3.4 meters). REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
A Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) employee tapes off the turnstiles to bar access to the subway in New York October 28, 2012. Hurricane Sandy, which could become the largest storm ever to hit the U.S., is set to bring much of the East Coast, including New York and Washington, to a virtual standstill in the next few days with battering winds, flooding and the risk of widespread power outages. New York and other cities and towns closed their transit systems and schools and ordered residents of low-lying areas to evacuate before a storm surge that could reach as high as 11 feet (3.4 meters). REUTERS/Carlo Allegri

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Hurricane Irene Kills 8, Aims For New York-Photos

Packing winds of up to 85 miles (140 kilometers) an hour, Irene was a weakened but still deadly category one storm when it made landfall at 8:00 am (1200 GMT) at Cape Lookout, North Carolina, near a chain of barrier islands

On Saturday August 27, 2011, Hurricane Irene was a deadly category one storm when it made landfall at 8:00 am (1200 GMT) at Cape Lookout, North Carolina, near a chain of barrier islands.

At least eight people were killed so far.

It may make a direct hit on New York city by Sunday morning >>>please click here for ‘Hurricane Irene Pounded New York City, 21 Killed In East Coast – Photos’ <<<

Irene knocked out power supplies for some 900,000 people, triggered the cancellation of more than 8,000 flights, and forced nearly two million people to evacuate.

A tornado as a result of Hurricane Irene touched down in the Old Orchard Road and New Road area west of Lewes, Del. Saturday, Aug. 27, 2011 damaging several homes and uprooting trees. (AP Photo/The Daily Times, Chuck Snyder
A boey that sits at the end of the Ocean City jetty is toppled over due to heavy surf caused by the arrival of Hurricane Irene in Ocean City, Maryland. Hurricane Irene killed at least eight people along the US east coast, cut power supplies to nearly a million and churned toward a direct hit on an anxious New York city. The Coney Island Wonder Wheel looms in the background as residents walks along the platform to catch one of the few remaining subway trains for the day while evacuating before the arrival of Hurricane Irene Saturday, Aug. 27, 2011 in Coney Island section of New York. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)
A combination photo shows the surf at (EST) 15:40 (top) and 18:50 as Hurricane Irene approaches Ocean City, Maryland August 27, 2011. Irene, packing winds of near 80 miles per hour, was a Category 1 hurricane on the five-step Saffir-Simpson intensity scale and was churning north-northeast at 16 mph, the U.S. National Hurricane Center said. REUTERS/Molly Riley
People walk as it rains in Hoboken in New Jersey August 27, 2011. Hurricane Irene charged up the U.S. East Coast on Saturday toward New York, shutting down the city, and millions of Americans sought shelter from a huge storm that halted transport and caused massive power blackouts. REUTERS/Kena Betancur
Summer resident Jody Bowers braces himself from a blast of sand and driving rain as he makes his way to the beach in Kill Devil Hills, Outer Banks, N.C., Saturday, Aug. 27, 2011 as Hurricane Irene reaches the North Carolina coast. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
Abandoned beach front houses are surrounded by rising water as the effects of Hurricane Irene are felt in Nags Head, N.C., Saturday, Aug. 27, 2011 (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)
Waves crash onto a beach in Ocean City, Md., Saturday, Aug. 27, 2011, as Hurricane Irene heads toward the Maryland coast. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
A taxi speeds by on 42nd Street at Times Square in New York as rains fall before Hurricane Irene hits August 27, 2011. Hurricane Irene charged up the U.S. East Coast on Saturday toward New York, shutting down the city, and millions of Americans sought shelter from a huge storm that halted transport and caused massive power blackouts. REUTERS/Peter Jones
Rain from Hurricane Irene pounds the boardwalk in Ocean City, Maryland, August 27, 2011. REUTERS/Molly Riley
Floodwaters caused by Hurricane Irene cover a sidewalk on a street in Ocean City, Maryland, August 27, 2011. REUTERS/Molly Riley
Sandbags surround one of the entrances to the New York Stock Exchange, Saturday, Aug. 27, 2011 in New York. Hurricane Irene opened its assault on the Eastern Seaboard on Saturday by lashing the North Carolina coast with wind as strong as 115 mph (185 kph) and pounding shoreline homes with waves. Farther north, Philadelphia and New York City-area authorities readied a massive shutdown of trains and airports, with 2 million people ordered out of the way.(AP Photo/Mary Altaffer
Storm clouds loom over lower Manhattan, Saturday, Aug. 27, 2011 in New York. Hurricane Irene opened its assault on the Eastern Seaboard on Saturday by lashing the North Carolina coast with wind as strong as 115 mph (185 kph) and pounding shoreline homes with waves. Farther north, Philadelphia and New York City-area authorities readied a massive shutdown of trains and airports, with 2 million people ordered out of the way.(AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
Floodwaters caused by Hurricane Irene cover an intersection in Ocean City, Maryland, August 27, 2011. Irene, packing winds of near 80 miles per hour, was a Category 1 hurricane on the five-step Saffir-Simpson intensity scale and was churning north-northeast at 16 mph, the U.S. National Hurricane Center said. REUTERS/Molly Riley
A truck drives through a flooded roadway near Rudee inlet as Hurricane Irene hits Virginia Beach , Va., Saturday, Aug. 27, 2011. Irene knocked out power and piers in North Carolina, clobbered Virginia with wind and churned up the coast Saturday to confront cities more accustomed to snowstorms than tropical storms. (AP Photo/Steve Helber
A high water sign is seen partially submerged on a street in Ocean City, Md., Saturday, Aug. 27, 2011, as Hurricane Irene heads toward the Maryland coast. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
A National Guard vehicle plows through floodwaters caused by Hurricane Irene in Ocean City, Maryland, August 27, 2011. REUTERS/Molly Riley
Floodwaters from the Albemarle Sound rise over a mini golf course at dusk on the Outer Banks in Nags Head, N.C., Saturday, Aug. 27, 2011 as Hurricane Irene leaves the North Carolina coast. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
People wade through a street flooded by Hurricane Irene Saturday, Aug. 27, 2011 in Manteo, N.C. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
Floodwaters rise at dusk from the Albemarle Sound on the Outer Banks in Nags Head, N.C., Saturday, Aug. 27, 2011. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
Floodwaters rise at dusk from the Albemarle Sound on the Outer Banks in Nags Head, N.C., Saturday, Aug. 27, 2011. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
The Arr-Mac water rescue team from Wayne County maneuvers around a beached boat in the middle of Hwy. 304 Saturday, Aug. 27, 2011 in Mesic, N.C. New York City emptied its streets and subways and waited with an eerie quiet. (AP Photo/The News & Observer, Chris Seward)
Two men use a boat to explore a street flooded by Hurricane Irene Saturday, Aug. 27, 2011 in Monteo, N.C. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
Floodwaters surround this pickup truck on Hwy 55 Saturday, Aug. 27, 2011 in New Bern, N.C.(AP Photo/The News & Observer, Chris Seward)
KILL DEVIL HILLS, NC - AUGUST 27: Firefighters wade through floodwater as they respond to a call of a gas leak during Hurricane Irene on August 27, 2011 in Kill Devil Hills, North Carolina. Hurricane Irene hit Dare County, which sits along the Outer Banks and includes the vacation towns of Nags Head, Kitty Hawk and Kill Devil Hills, as a category one hurricane around mid-day today causing wind damage and flooding. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
The canopy from the Days Inn blew off Saturday, Aug. 27, 2011 in Washington, N.C. AP Photo/The News & Observer, Chris Seward)
A travel trailer tipped over into a flooded area on Hwy 55 Saturday, Aug. 27, 2011 in New Bern, N.C. (AP Photo/The News & Observer, Chris Seward)

Hurricane Irene Nears North Carolina – Photos

Map showing the path of Hurricane Irene, which is projected to advance to the US east coast at the weekend

(Please click here for the latest photos of Hurricane Irene pounding the US East Coast).

Hurricane Irene is still a dangerous Category 1 as storm nears North Carolina.

Hurricane warnings were issued from North Carolina to New York.

A lone beachgoer is seen in Nags Head, N.C., Friday, Aug. 26, 2011 after evacuations in preparation for Hurricane Irene have left the area mostly deserted. The full force of Hurricane Irene was still a day away from the East Coast but heightened waves began hitting North Carolina's Outer Banks early Friday. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)
Hurricane Irene's outer bands reach Kill Devil Hills, N.C., early Saturday, Aug. 27, 2011. Hurricane Irene has weakened to a Category 1 storm as it nears the North Carolina coast but forecasters say it remains extremely dangerous. Hurricane warnings were issued from North Carolina to New York, and evacuation orders covered at least 2.3 million people, including 1 million in New Jersey, 315,000 in Maryland, 300,000 in North Carolina, 200,000 in Virginia and 100,000 in Delaware. (AP Photo/Robert Ray)
Heavy rains and wind from Hurricane Irene whip the sand on the beach at Pawleys Island, S.C., Friday, Aug. 26, 2011. Hurricane Irene began lashing the East Coast with rain Friday ahead of a weekend of violent weather that was almost certain to heap punishment on a vast stretch of shoreline from the Carolinas to Massachusetts. (AP Photo/Bruce Smith)
Hurricane Irene's outer bands reach Kill Devil Hills, N.C., early Saturday, Aug. 27, 2011. (AP Photo/Robert Ray)