Storm Desmond: Severe Flooding In Cumbria (Photos)

6 12 2015
Flooded roads in Appleby in Cumbria, as Storm Desmond hit the UK. (Press Association)

Flooded roads in Appleby in Cumbria, as Storm Desmond hit the UK. (Press Association)

Police have declared a major incident in Cumbria after heavy rain and strong wind up to 80mph brought by Storm Desmond caused severe flooding in Cumbria.

Cumbria is amongst the worst affected area in England by the storm where the River Greta near Keswick and the River Eden at Appleby overflowed, despite glass flood defences installed.

The village of Shap in Cumbria received the highest rainfall which is 7in (178.2mm) in 24 hours until 7pm on Saturday.

The average rainfall for Cumbria for December is 5.75in (146.1mm).

Some rivers in the area reached their highest ever recorded levels; and some road and highways were flooded.

The village of Braithwaite was cut off, after the main bridge connecting it to the rest of the county was swept away by the swollen river.

In Scotland, people were evacuated in Hawick after the River Teviot burst its banks and the Nith was flooded in Dumfries.

More than 80 flood warnings are in place around the UK, particularly Scotland, northern England, Wales and the Midlands.

Please click the photos for larger images:

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In Photos: Icy Blast Hits UK

30 01 2015
Weathe picture in Sheffield, South Yorkshire at the war memorial covered in snow outside the church on Hollinsend Road, Manor

Weathe picture in Sheffield, South Yorkshire at the war memorial covered in snow outside the church on Hollinsend Road, Manor

Heavy snow fell in Scotland, Northern Ireland and the north of England causing major travel disruption.

Schools were closed in Scotland, Northern Ireland, Cumbria, Lancashire and Tameside, Greater Manchester.

Main roads in Durham, Yorkshire and north Wales were blocked, while more than a dozen rail services between Manchester and York were cancelled.





Lego Hunting, Anyone?

27 07 2014
Lego pieces have been turning up on British beaches since 1997. (Tracey Williams/LegoLostAtSea)

Lego pieces have been turning up on British beaches since 1997. (Tracey Williams/LegoLostAtSea)

Looking for a place for Lego hunting?

Go to Cornwall, England!

For the last 17 years, Lego hunters can find Lego pieces at beaches in Cornwall, England.

On February 13, 1997, a shipping container filled with nearly 5 million Lego pieces was thrown into the sea about 32 kilometres off the British south coast after the Tokio Express ship carrying them was struck by a huge wave.

Below are some of the Lego pieces collected at the beaches.

A green Lego dragon on the shore (Tracey Williams/LegoLostAtSea)

A green Lego dragon on the shore (Tracey Williams/LegoLostAtSea)

A Lego octopus found in a cave in South Devon, England, in the late 1990s. (Tracey Williams/LegoLostAtSea)

A Lego octopus found in a cave in South Devon, England, in the late 1990s. (Tracey Williams/LegoLostAtSea)

A guide to Lego pieces collected from U.K. beaches (Tracey Williams/LegoLostAtSea)

A guide to Lego pieces collected from U.K. beaches (Tracey Williams/LegoLostAtSea)

A Lego pirate's cutlass washed up in Newquay, May 12, 2014. (Tracey Williams/LegoLostAtSea)

A Lego pirate’s cutlass washed up in Newquay, May 12, 2014. (Tracey Williams/LegoLostAtSea)





Then And Now: Photos Of D-Day Landings (Part 1)

10 06 2014

On June 6, 1944, allied soldiers descended on the beaches of Normandy for D-Day – an operation that turned the tide of the Second World War against the Nazis, marking the beginning of the end of the conflict.

Today, as many around the world prepare to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the landings, pictures of Normandy’s now-touristy beaches stand in stark contrast to images taken around the time of the invasion. 

Reuters photographer Chris Helgren compiled a series of archive pictures taken during the 1944 invasion and then went back to the same places, to photograph them as they appear today. (Reuters)

The 2nd Battalion U.S. Army Rangers, tasked with capturing the German heavy coastal defense battery at Pointe du Hoc to the west of the D-Day landing zone of Omaha Beach, march to their landing craft in Weymouth, England, on June 5, 1944 in this handout photo provided by the US National Archives. (REUTERS/US National Archives)

The 2nd Battalion U.S. Army Rangers, tasked with capturing the German heavy coastal defense battery at Pointe du Hoc to the west of the D-Day landing zone of Omaha Beach, march to their landing craft in Weymouth, England, on June 5, 1944 in this handout photo provided by the US National Archives. (REUTERS/US National Archives)

Tourists walk along the beach-front in the Dorset holiday town of Weymouth, England, July 13, 2013. The port was the departure point for thousands of Allied troops who took part in the D-Day landings. (REUTERS/Chris Helgren)

Tourists walk along the beach-front in the Dorset holiday town of Weymouth, England, July 13, 2013. The port was the departure point for thousands of Allied troops who took part in the D-Day landings. (REUTERS/Chris Helgren)

U.S. troops wade ashore from a Coast Guard landing craft at Omaha Beach during the Normandy D-Day landings near Vierville sur Mer, France, on June 6, 1944. (REUTERS/US National Archives)

U.S. troops wade ashore from a Coast Guard landing craft at Omaha Beach during the Normandy D-Day landings near Vierville sur Mer, France, on June 6, 1944. (REUTERS/US National Archives)

Tourists take part in a land sailing class on the former D-Day landing zone of Omaha beach near Vierville sur Mer, France August 22, 2013. (REUTERS/Chris Helgren)

Tourists take part in a land sailing class on the former D-Day landing zone of Omaha beach near Vierville sur Mer, France August 22, 2013. (REUTERS/Chris Helgren)

U.S. Army troops congregate around a signal post used by engineers on the site of a captured German bunker overlooking Omaha Beach after the D-Day landings near Saint Laurent sur Mer June 7, 1944. (REUTERS/US National Archives)

U.S. Army troops congregate around a signal post used by engineers on the site of a captured German bunker overlooking Omaha Beach after the D-Day landings near Saint Laurent sur Mer June 7, 1944. (REUTERS/US National Archives)

Tourists walk past a former German bunker overlooking the D-Day landing zone on Omaha Beach near Saint Laurent sur Mer, France, August 24, 2013. (REUTERS/Chris Helgren)

Tourists walk past a former German bunker overlooking the D-Day landing zone on Omaha Beach near Saint Laurent sur Mer, France, August 24, 2013. (REUTERS/Chris Helgren)

U.S. Army reinforcements march up a hill past a German bunker overlooking Omaha Beach after the D-Day landings near Colleville sur Mer, France, June 18, 1944. (REUTERS/US National Archives)

U.S. Army reinforcements march up a hill past a German bunker overlooking Omaha Beach after the D-Day landings near Colleville sur Mer, France, June 18, 1944. (REUTERS/US National Archives)

Youths hike up a hill past an old German bunker overlooking the former D-Day landing zone of Omaha Beach near Colleville sur Mer, France, August 23, 2013. (REUTERS/Chris Helgren)

Youths hike up a hill past an old German bunker overlooking the former D-Day landing zone of Omaha Beach near Colleville sur Mer, France, August 23, 2013. (REUTERS/Chris Helgren)

U.S. Army troops make a battle plan in a farmyard amid cattle, which were killed by artillery bursts, near the D-Day landing zone of Utah Beach in Les Dunes de Varreville, France, on June 6, 1944. (REUTERS/US National Archives)

U.S. Army troops make a battle plan in a farmyard amid cattle, which were killed by artillery bursts, near the D-Day landing zone of Utah Beach in Les Dunes de Varreville, France, on June 6, 1944. (REUTERS/US National Archives)

Farmer Raymond Bertot, who was 19 when allied troops came ashore in 1944, poses on his property near the former D-Day landing zone of Utah Beach in Les Dunes de Varreville, France, August 21, 2013. (REUTERS/Chris Helgren)

Farmer Raymond Bertot, who was 19 when allied troops came ashore in 1944, poses on his property near the former D-Day landing zone of Utah Beach in Les Dunes de Varreville, France, August 21, 2013. (REUTERS/Chris Helgren)

Please click for: Then And Now: Photos Of D-Day Landings (Part 2)





Tan Sri Tengku Razaleigh Hamzah

7 12 2013

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Tan Sri Tengku Razaleigh Hamzah, who is fondly known as Ku Li is the Member of Parliament of Gua Musang in Kelantan and is now the longest-serving member of parliament in Malaysia.

Ku Li was the Malaysian Finance Minister from 1976 to 1984, long before I was born.

I always met Tengku Razaleigh after the Friday Prayer but I’ve never thought of taking a photo with him before.

Then one day I thought that I must have a photo with him because he is my grandfather’s friend.

They met in England and Ku Li calls my grandfather, ‘Mad Cairo’ because my grandfather studied in Cairo for a few years before going to England to further his studies.

Ku Li is very nice and friendly and is very popular among the Malaysians.

After the Friday Prayers, there will be a long line of people who wants to greet him.

One Friday, after the Friday Prayer, I met him by the sliding door and asked his assistant to take our photo.

I’m so happy that I finally have a photo of me with Ku Li.





Beautiful Sights On This Incredible Planet From CNN

2 09 2013
A rainbow created by the moon -- definitely worth a look.

A rainbow created by the moon — definitely worth a look.

Our planet Earth is very beautiful.

There are so many beautiful places for us to visit and enjoy their beauty.

But these places will be gone if we do not take care of our planet and if there are wars around the world.

Let us take good care of our planet and please stop the wars.

Please click here for more images:





Happy 100th Anniversary To Aston Martin!

30 07 2013
The most iconic Aston Martin model -- and the one most frequently seen on screen -- is the DB5, produced from 1963 to 1965. Sean Connery first revved its engine in "Goldfinger" in 1964.

The most iconic Aston Martin model — and the one most frequently seen on screen — is the DB5, produced from 1963 to 1965. Sean Connery first revved its engine in “Goldfinger” in 1964.

The company was founded a hundred years ago, on January 15, 1913 by Robert Bamford and Lionel Martin as ‘Bamford & Martin LTD’ in England.

Aston Martin has become an iconic brand most recognized as movie character James Bond’s getaway car of choice.

Here are some photos of Aston Martin throughout the years….

Please click the photos for larger images:








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