Aftermath of Great Mississippi River Flooding – Bonnet Carre Spillway Last Floodgate Is Closed In Pictures

24 06 2011

During the Mississippi River flooding, the US Army Corps of Engineers opened  floodgates of the Bonnet Carre Spillway and later the Morganza Spillway.

The Bonnet Carre Spillway was opened on May 9, to divert flood water from the Mississippi River into Lake Pontchartrain.

330 of the spillway’s 350 bays were opened before the corps started closing them on June 12.

The last 20 bays were closed on Monday.

On May 14, the Morganza floodway was opened to diverted water from the Mississippi into the Atchafalaya River, which carried it into the Gulf of Mexico.

It caused some flooding in the Atchafalaya Basin.

The number of gates opened on the Morganza peaked at 17.

Only one gate remained open as of Monday morning.

This two picture combo shows the Bonnet Carre Spillway, thirty miles upriver from New Orleans, on May 9, 2011, when it was opened to divert rising water from the Mississippi River into Lake Pontchartrain, left, and Monday, June 20, 2011, right, when the last bays were closed, in Norco, La. Corps officials don't think the Missouri River's flood is going to have significant impact on the lower Mississippi. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers workers close the final bays of the Bonnet Carre Spillway just above New Orleans in Norco, Miss., Monday, June 20, 2011. The gates were opened weeks ago, pouring fresh water into Lake Pontchartrain, as high water on the Mississippi River threatened levees. Corps officials don't think the Missouri River's flood is going to have significant impact on the lower Mississippi. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

Shore birds hunting for stranded fish fly over a formerly submerged roadway as U.S. Army Corps of Engineers workers close the final bays of the Bonnet Carre Spillway just above New Orleans in Norco, La., Monday, June 20, 2011. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

In this June 16, 2011 photograph this mailbox shows what two weeks under Mississippi River floodwaters can do, as residents of the affected areas begin their cleanup. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

In this June 16, 2011 photograph James Winters walks slowly through the sweltering remains of his Vicksburg, Miss., waterlogged home, wipes the sweat from his brow and ponders if his home of over 20 years, can be saved. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

In this June 16, 2011 photograph the sagging mold covered blades of this ceiling fan in the Vicksburg, Miss., home of James Winters shows the height the Mississippi River floodwaters reached as waters almost reached the roof of the home at its highest crest. (AP Photo/Holbrook Mohr)

The Mississippi River indicator on the new Mississippi River Bridge shows the height of the 2011 record flooding, Thursday, June 16, 2011 in Vicksburg, Miss. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

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