Incredible Photos of Foxes in Their Wild

24 05 2018

[Yahoo News}- These enchanting images capture a rare glimpse into the lives of wild foxes who trusted a wildlife photographer to enter their forest lair.

The bushy-tailed creatures look almost like characters from a fairy tale as they’re pictured playing, hunting and feeding their young.

Ossi Saarinen, 21, spent months growing close to the foxes before being rewarded with the set of pictures which truly capture their natural beauty.

He said: ‘Getting close to foxes is difficult. I prefer is to let them see me and learn I’m not a threat to gain their trust.

‘I try to shoot in a beautiful morning or evening light that makes the photos looks different than if they were taken in normal daylight.

‘I believe I became some kind of “friend” with them as they started to let me closer and closer all the time.’

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Photos: Amazing Photos From the Royal Society Photography Competition 2017

1 03 2018

The photo, taken in early 1995 during a flight over the English Coast (southern Antarctic Peninsula) at about 74 degrees south, illustrates the scale of unusual bi-directional crevassing as an ice sheet is stretched in two directions over an underlying rise, with a Twin Otter aeroplane as scale. It was named as Overall winner and winner in the Earth Science and Climatology category. (PA)

[Yahoo! News}- From bear-shaped embryos to Antarctic glaciers and sleepy polar bears, the Royal Society photography competition shows the wonders of science like never before.

The annual competition saw a record-breaking 1,100 entries this year.

‘Icy sugar cubes’ by Peter Convey was judged the overall winner, as well as claiming first place in the Earth Science and Climatology category.

Mr Convey said: ‘It’s been an incredible privilege to work in the Antarctic for nearly 30 years now, every time I go there it takes my breath away.’

The aim of the competition is to use images to make science accessible to a wide audience.

Entrants could put forward their images for six different categories: Astronomy, Behaviour, Earth Science and Climatology, Ecology and Environmental Science, and Micro-imaging.

Judge Ulrike Muller said: ‘The winning image epitomises the aims of this competition – celebrating the power of photography to communicate science.

‘The image shows the stunning beauty of a rare geological phenomenon, bi-directional crevassing in an ice sheet, and invites the viewer to wonder at the scale and the mechanisms creating such patterns.’





Photos: Amazing Close-up Photos of Snowflakes

11 02 2018

[Caters News}- These incredible images capture the intricate details of minuscule snowflakes, moments before they melt. The brilliant shots were taken by Don Komarechka, 31, who has had a lifelong fascination with all things macro — especially snowflakes.

The professional photographer says people often don’t believe that his pictures are real because they’re so perfect. The Canadian said, “These photos were all taken 2 feet from my back door over the past two winters.”

We’re looking at the intricate details of ice crystals that form in the atmosphere and fall to earth. Snowflakes can possess unending beauty and detail even in a single crystal measuring only a few millimeters in diameter.





Amazing Photos from the Wildlife Photographer of the Year People’s Choice Award Shortlist

23 01 2018

[Yahoo! News}- Majestic birds and colourful sea creatures are only some of the breathtaking animals to make the shortlist for the People’s Choice award in the Wildlife Photographer of the Year annual competition.

This year, almost 50,000 submissions from 92 countries were entered for the prestigious award.

The shortlisted images are currently on display at the highly-acclaimed exhibition at the Natural History Museum in London, until the vote closes on 5 February 2018.

The winner of the vote will then be showcased until the exhibition closes on 28 May 2018.

The ‘People’s Choice’ annual award recognises exceptional competition entries as chosen by the public.

Wildlife Photographer of the Year is the longest-running competition of its kind.

The competition is a vital part of the Natural History Museum’s mission to inspire a love for the natural world and unlock answers to the big issues facing humanity and the planet.





Photos: Winners of Sanctuary Wildlife’s Photography Awards

7 12 2017

Hell is Here: The heat from the fire scorches their delicate skin as mother and child attempt to flee the mob. In the lead, the cow’s expansive ears are angled forward as she stoicly ignores the crowd of jeering men. Behind her, her calf screams in confusion and fear as the fire licks at her feet. Flaming tar balls and crackers fly through the air to a soundtrack of human laughter and shouts. In the Bankura district of West Bengal this sort of humiliation of pachyderms is routine, as it is in the other elephant-range states of Assam, Odisha, Chhattisgarh, Tamil Nadu and more. India is the world’s stronghold for the Asian elephant and boasts over 70 per cent of the global population of the species. But this achievement rings hollow as vital elephant habitats and routes continue to be ravaged, and human-elephant conflict escalates to a fatal degree. The ignorance and bloodlust of mobs that attack herds for fun, is compounded by the plight of those that actually suffer damage to land, life and property by wandering elephants and the utter indifference of the central and state government to recognise the crisis that is at hand. For these smart, gentle, social animals who have roamed the sub-continent for centuries, hell is now and here.

[AOL.com}- A horrific photo of a mother and baby elephant fleeing an angry mob in West Bengal, India, has won the top award in a wildlife photography competition.

The hard-to-look-at image, taken by photographer Biplab Hazra, shows the two panicked pachyderms desperately trying to flee a large group of laughing men who are hurling flaming tar balls and firecrackers at the creatures.

Hazra’s photo captures the exact moment one of the flaming weapons makes contact with the baby elephant, lighting the helpless animal’s hind legs on fire while it screams out in pain.

In his entry to Sanctuary Wildlife’s Photography awards, Hazra writes that this is sadly not an uncommon scene in India, “the world’s stronghold for the Asian elephant.”

The heat from the fire scorches their delicate skin as mother and child attempt to flee the mob. In the lead, the cow’s expansive ears are angled forward as she stoicly ignores the crowd of jeering men. Behind her, her calf screams in confusion and fear as the fire licks at her feet. Flaming tar balls and crackers fly through the air to a soundtrack of human laughter and shouts. In the Bankura district of West Bengal this sort of humiliation of pachyderms is routine.

Hazra said that, although India boasts 70 percent of the global population of the Asian elephant, vital elephant habitats and routes are often ravaged by human beings and the “human-elephant conflict” has escalated to a fatal degree.

“The ignorance and bloodlust of mobs that attack herds for fun, is compounded by the plight of those that actually suffer damage to land, life and property by wandering elephants and the utter indifference of the central and state government to recognize the crisis that is at hand,” he wrote. “For these smart, gentle, social animals who have roamed the sub-continent for centuries, hell is now and here.”

It remains unknown what became of the two elephants seen in the award-winning photo.

Hazra’s devastating image was recognized by Sanctuary, India’s leading nature and conservation portal. The organization says it aims to “communicate to readers the rationale for wildlife conservation and environmental protection with a focus on the Indian subcontinent.”

In the years since its inception, the group claims to have been at the fulcrum of innumerable wildlife conservation campaigns, conservation project and serves as a forum for wildlife groups, concerned individuals and non-profit organizations in the country.

Below are the photos of some of the winning photos.





Photos: National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Highlights

8 10 2017

“The image was taken from Hallstat Village in Austria right after sunrise. I had to walk some distance to reach this village view point.” (Shanof K. / National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year contest)

[Yahoo News}- From the heights of the Arctic to the depths of Africa, week two of the National Geographic Nature photographer of the year contest features a range of Earth’s most fascinating and beautiful creatures and landscapes.

The annual competition is split into four subsections: Wildlife, Landscapes, Underwater and Aerials.

A winner will be selected from each category at the end of November, before one overall winner is selected in December.

Patrick Witty, National Geographic’s Deputy Director of Digital Photography, said of the competition so far: “The strength and diversity of the submitted photos are always astounding, and this contest gives those incredible entries a platform that is seen by millions ­– including National Geographic’s photo editors.”

Here are some of the best entries so far.





Beautiful Scenery of Cameron Highlands

5 10 2017

Cameron Highlands is not only about strawberries and flower gardens, the beautiful scenery and landscapes, and the greenery is something we cannot easily find in the city.

Unfortunately, the commercial farms have somehow spoilt the greenery of the highlands.

These photos are taken during my brief visit to Cameron Highlands two days ago.








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