Lambert-St. Louis International Airport Hit By Tornado – Pictures

Storm damage is seen next to a parking garage outside terminal one at St. Louis International Airport Friday, April 22, 2011, in St. Louis. Several people at the airport were injured Friday after an apparent tornado touched down, spewing debris over the airfield, bursting glass in the concourse and damaging cars atop a parking garage. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

St. Louis’ main airport was closed on Saturday after a tornado hit the main terminal.

Several people were injured.

The storm and tornado also damaged houses and downed trees and power lines.

This is a disaster.

( Please click here for my post on ‘Bad Storms And Tornadoes In Southern USA – In Pictures’ )

Storm damage is seen next to a parking garage outside terminal one at St. Louis International Airport Friday, April 22, 2011, in St. Louis. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)
Storm damage is seen next to a parking garage outside terminal one at St. Louis International Airport Friday, April 22, 2011, in St. Louis. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)
A van hangs over the side of a parking garage at Lambert St. Louis International Airport Friday, April 22, 2011, in St. Louis. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)
A van hangs over the side of a parking garage at Lambert St. Louis International Airport Friday, April 22, 2011, in St. Louis. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

‘100 Places to Go Before They Disappear’, A Book By Gaute Hogh

Gaute Hogh wrote a book  named, ‘100 Places to Go Before They Disappear’.

The book was about the effect of global warming that can make some places disappear.

Global warming makes the earth hotter and hotter and sea level rises up because of ice melting at the North Pole and South Pole.

In Zahara de la Sierra, Andalusia, Spain, they get less and less rain and the place becomes drier and slowly turning into a desert; like bad drought in Kenya were killing plants and animals.

I think that it is a very good book for all of us to read, so that we can do our parts to stop the global warming and heal the world.

It will very sad to see all the beautiful places disappear.

( Please click here for my post, ‘Ways To Heal Our Earth’ )

I wish I can have a copy of  ‘100 Places to Go Before They Disappear’ 🙂

Go Green!

( Please click here for my post, ‘Plea For Survival’ about the effect of global warming ).

The southern shoreline of Manhattan Island, known as the Battery, is the largest public place in downtown New York. Hundreds of thousands work nearby and over 36,000 residents live in its surrounding area. About every 100 years, the area experiences extreme flooding that reaches heights of up to 10 feet. Climate change is expected to increase the frequency of winds and hurricanes and cause sea levels to rise. According to the worse-case scenario, extreme events may occur every four years by 2080, with floods raising water levels by 11-14 feet and paralyzing the whole Manhattan infrastructure. “The tidal area there with the Hudson River is a very beautiful place but it will go underwater,” Hogh warns. “There is more than 280,000 people working in this walking district.”
Esteemed as a winter wonderland, Austria and the Alpine region is Europe’s snow resort Mecca. It’s also gorgeous in summer with its evergreen pastures and cascading mountainsides, made famous by the classic Hollywood musical 'The Sound of Music.' “Everyone here in Europe is used to going there, for skiing,” Hogh explains. “They’ve been skiing there for the last 200 years and some of the country is less and less snow.They try to make snow with snow cannons. You’re not allowed to heli-ski as much anymore because of the pollution. It will go down by 80% of its normal size. Will my children be able to ski there? I don’t know.'
The Mississippi River Delta, with its rivers, marshes and barrier islands, provides a habitat for many species of birds, fish, shellfish and small mammals. At the rim of the delta, the Chandeleur Islands form a chain that acts as a buffer zone against hurricanes and storm surges for the densely populated regions of Louisiana and Mississippii. But ferocious storms, like 2005’s Hurricane Katrina, have greatly reduced the islands’ defenses. Storms and hurricanes are expected to grow even fiercer in the future with global warming, leaving the local environment and vital culture more exposed to destruction.
Stretching for 90 miles along the Californian coast midway between San Francisco and Los Angeles, Big Sur is arguably one of the most breathtaking landscapes in the U.S. For the last 20 years, most of California has been experiencing increased droughts with less rainfall in the spring and summer, leading to a severe escalation in the number of large wildfires. In 2008, a major fire destroyed 16 houses in Big Sur and more than 50 square miles of forest were swallowed by flames. Fires and subsequent flooding also threaten the region’s fragile access roads and infrastructure.
The first Olympic Games are believed to have been held in Olympia, Greece, in 776 B.C. The earliest evidence of building at the site is the Temple of Hera, honoring the wife of Zeus, which dates to around 600 B.C. In recent years, extremely warm and dry summers have increased the number of wildfires in Greece. Fires in 2007 severely burned the area surrounding Olympia. With temperatures projected to rise with diminishing rains, the frequency and ferocity of wildfires are expected to grow. “If you go to Olympia in Greece and you can’t see it, that will be part of our history which will disappear,” Hogh says.
Gujarat is India’s largest producer of cotton and salt and is also the birthplace of Mahatma Gahdhi. Monsoons will intensify with continued global warming, causing severe flooding and destruction in India. In 1930, Gandhi launched a campaign against the British salt tax, which had made it illegal for Indians to produce their own salt. He eventually won that fight. India is now the third biggest cotton producer in the world after the U.S. and China and the majority of its cotton comes from Gujarat.
Hogh describes Zahara de la Sierra as “a white city in this very green place.” Also known for its olive oil production, the region faces the risk of desert- ification as olive orchards face increasingly dry seasons. Due to climate change, the IPCC projects that rainfall in southern Spain will decrease by 40% by 2080. Local temperatures in the Iberian Peninsula could also spike, turning green pastures into deserts and choking agriculture.
Kauai, the fourth largest Hawaiian island, is famous for its tropical beauty and lush mountains. Global warming could disrupt its distinct “cloud forest” ecosystem, pushing life-giving moisture to higher elevations. Home to the hummingbird-like honeycreeper, a rare and colorful animal that sips nectar from flowers, this cool zone is vital to Kauai’s verdant environment. Deforestation and non-indigenous species like pigs and goats have also decimated the honeycreeper’s habitat in recent years and the bird is now in danger of going extinct.
Located between Australia and Hawaii, in one of the most remote areas of the Pacific Ocean, lies the nation of Tuvalu. Only 10-square miles – made up of tropical reef islands and narrow coral atolls encompassing blue lagoons -- Tuvalu is the fourth smallest country in the world. Only 12,000 people inhabit the nine-island nation. At 16 feet above sea level, the country has one of the lowest maximum elevations in the world, making it extremely vulnerable to storms and changes in sea level. Tuvalu is also affected by the King Tide, a high tide that raises the sea level higher than normal. Coupled with the expected rise in global sea levels, the entire nation could ultimately become submerged. “I don’t care whether the place is big or small,” Hogh concludes. “It’s the same thing with people. No matter if you’re black or white or Chinese or whatever. It’s about treating each other with respect and it’s the same thing with these small islands.'

Bad Storms And Tornadoes In Southern USA – In Pictures

AP Photo/Jim R. Bounds

At least 45 people were killed in the deadly storms and tornadoes in North Carolina, Arkansas, Alabama, Virginia, Mississippi and Oklahoma.

A lot of people were injured during the 3 days disaster.

I am very sad and sorry for all the victims, their families and friends.

A tornado flattened most of this home in the LaGrange subdivision in Fayetteville near Fort Bragg Saturday April 16, 2011.A tornado flattened most of this home in the LaGrange subdivision, Saturday, April 16, 2011 in Fayetteville, N.C. Homes and businesses were badly damaged Saturday by a severe storm system that whipped across North Carolina, bringing flash floods, hail and reports of tornadoes from the western hills to the streets of Raleigh. (AP Photo/The Fayetteville Observer, James Robinson) .
A Lowes employee takes a picture outside a storm-damaged Lowes Home Improvement store after a tornado in Sanford, North Carolina, April 17, 2011. REUTERS/Chris Keane
Family and friends sort through debris from a tornado that swept through the area Saturday night in Gloucester, Va., Sunday, April 17, 2011. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
FILE - Only stairs and flowers remain Saturday, April 16, 2011 after severe winds tore a mobile home off its lot late Friday night in Boones Chapel, Ala., in Autauga County. Vicious storms and howling winds smacked the Deep South, killing at least seven people in Alabama including three family members whose homes were tossed into nearby woods. (AP Photo/Montgomery Advertiser, Amanda Sowards)
Part of a mobile home is turned over in a field of debris after a possible tornado in Autauga County hit late Friday night, April 15, 2011. Three people were killed and several homes destroyed. (Montgomery Advertiser, Amanda Sowards)
Two mobile homes in Autauga County are destroyed and three are dead after a tornado hit late Friday night, April 15, 2011. (Montgomery Advertiser, Amanda Sowards)
Emergency personnel enters Lowes Home Improvement after it was hit by a tornado in Sanford, N.C., Saturday, April 16, 2011. (AP Photo/Jim R. Bounds)
A destroyed desk sits among the rubble at Page Middle School in Gloucester, Virginia. The trail of destruction began on Thursday evening in Oklahoma, where a giant twister almost wiped out the small town of Tushka -- population 350 -- tearing up most of its homes and businesses and killing two elderly residents. (AFP//Getty Images/Jay Paul)

Deadly Storms And Tornado In Oklahoma And Arkansas – In Pictures

At least 16 people were killed in deadly storms and tornadoes that hit Oklahoma and Arkansas on Friday.

This is a natural disaster.

I am very sad and sorry for the victims, their families and friends.

An vehicle sits in a tree in Tushka, Okla., Friday, April 15, 2011, following a tornado the night before. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Volunteers pitch in to remove branches from a fallen oak tree in Tushka, Okla., Friday, April 15, 2011, following a tornado. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
People work among the aftermath of a tornado in Tushka, Okla., Friday, April 15, 2011. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
A vehicle rests on a tree after an overnight tornado in Tushka, Okla., Friday, April 15, 2011. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
A car parked outside a school classroom is covered in rubble Friday, April 15, 2011, after a wall fell on it during Thursday nights tornado, in Tushka, Okla. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)