Google Maps Adds Street Views Inside Japan Nuclear Zone

Google Street View shows images from Japan’s ghost towns deserted after nuclear disaster.

Please click here for Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant Disaster.

In this screenshot made from the Google Maps website provided Wednesday, March 27, 2013, by Google, showing a crushed building with the roof atop in March 2013, in Namie, Japan, a nuclear no-go zone where former residents have been unable to live since they fled from radioactive contamination from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant two years ago. Google Street View is giving the world a rare glimpse into Japan’s eerie ghost town, following the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami which sparked a nuclear disaster that has left the area uninhabitable. The photo technology pieces together digital images captured by Google's camera-equipped vehicle and allows viewers to take virtual tours of locations around the world, including faraway spots like the South Pole and fantastic landscapes like the Grand Canyon, or in this case contaminated deserted townscapes. (AP Photo/Google) EDITORIAL USE ONLY
In this screenshot made from the Google Maps website provided Wednesday, March 27, 2013, by Google, showing a crushed building with the roof atop in March 2013, in Namie, Japan, a nuclear no-go zone where former residents have been unable to live since they fled from radioactive contamination from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant two years ago. Google Street View is giving the world a rare glimpse into Japan’s eerie ghost town, following the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami which sparked a nuclear disaster that has left the area uninhabitable. The photo technology pieces together digital images captured by Google’s camera-equipped vehicle and allows viewers to take virtual tours of locations around the world, including faraway spots like the South Pole and fantastic landscapes like the Grand Canyon, or in this case contaminated deserted townscapes. (AP Photo/Google) EDITORIAL USE ONLY
In this screenshot made from the Google Maps website provided Wednesday, March 27, 2013, by Google, showing stranded ships left as a testament to the power of the tsunami which hit the area, near a road in March, 2013, in Namie, Japan, a nuclear no-go zone where former residents have been unable to live since they fled from radioactive contamination from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant two years ago. Google Street View is giving the world a rare glimpse into Japan’s eerie ghost town, following the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami which sparked a nuclear disaster that has left the area uninhabitable. The photo technology pieces together digital images captured by Google's camera-equipped vehicle and allows viewers to take virtual tours of locations around the world. (AP Photo/Google) EDITORIAL USE ONLY
In this screenshot made from the Google Maps website provided Wednesday, March 27, 2013, by Google, showing stranded ships left as a testament to the power of the tsunami which hit the area, near a road in March, 2013, in Namie, Japan, a nuclear no-go zone where former residents have been unable to live since they fled from radioactive contamination from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant two years ago. Google Street View is giving the world a rare glimpse into Japan’s eerie ghost town, following the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami which sparked a nuclear disaster that has left the area uninhabitable. The photo technology pieces together digital images captured by Google’s camera-equipped vehicle and allows viewers to take virtual tours of locations around the world. (AP Photo/Google) EDITORIAL USE ONLY
FILE - In this Dec. 29, 2012 file photo, the Unit 1 reactor building, left, and Unit 2 of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant are seen through a bus window in Okuma, Fukushima Prefecture, northeastern Japan. Tokyo Electric Power Co. acknowledged in a report Friday that it was not prepared to deal with the earthquake and tsunami that ravaged northeast Japan in March 2011, causing triple-meltdowns at its Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant. (AP Photo/Itsuo Inouye, Pool, File)
FILE – In this Dec. 29, 2012 file photo, the Unit 1 reactor building, left, and Unit 2 of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant are seen through a bus window in Okuma, Fukushima Prefecture, northeastern Japan. Tokyo Electric Power Co. acknowledged in a report Friday that it was not prepared to deal with the earthquake and tsunami that ravaged northeast Japan in March 2011, causing triple-meltdowns at its Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant. (AP Photo/Itsuo Inouye, Pool, File)
In this March, 2013 image released March 27, 2013, by Google, showing its camera-equipped vehicle as it moves through Namie town in Japan, a nuclear no-go zone where former residents have been unable to live since they fled from radioactive contamination from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant two years ago. Google Street View is giving the world a rare glimpse into Japan’s eerie ghost town, following the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami which sparked a nuclear disaster that has left the area uninhabitable. The photo technology pieces together digital images captured by Google’s fleet of camera-equipped vehicles and allows viewers to take virtual tours of locations around the world, including faraway spots like the South Pole and fantastic landscapes like the Grand Canyon, or in this case deserted townscapes.(AP Photo/Google) EDITORIAL USE ONLY
In this March, 2013 image released March 27, 2013, by Google, showing its camera-equipped vehicle as it moves through Namie town in Japan, a nuclear no-go zone where former residents have been unable to live since they fled from radioactive contamination from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant two years ago. Google Street View is giving the world a rare glimpse into Japan’s eerie ghost town, following the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami which sparked a nuclear disaster that has left the area uninhabitable. The photo technology pieces together digital images captured by Google’s fleet of camera-equipped vehicles and allows viewers to take virtual tours of locations around the world, including faraway spots like the South Pole and fantastic landscapes like the Grand Canyon, or in this case deserted townscapes.(AP Photo/Google) EDITORIAL USE ONLY
In this screenshot made from the Google Maps website provided Wednesday, March 27, 2013, by Google, showing tsunami-hit cars and houses are seen in March, 2013, in Namie, Japan, a nuclear no-go zone where former residents have been unable to live since they fled from radioactive contamination from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant two years ago. Google Street View is giving the world a rare glimpse into Japan’s eerie ghost town, following the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami which sparked a nuclear disaster that has left the area uninhabitable. (AP Photo/Google) EDITORIAL USE ONLY
In this screenshot made from the Google Maps website provided Wednesday, March 27, 2013, by Google, showing tsunami-hit cars and houses are seen in March, 2013, in Namie, Japan, a nuclear no-go zone where former residents have been unable to live since they fled from radioactive contamination from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant two years ago. Google Street View is giving the world a rare glimpse into Japan’s eerie ghost town, following the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami which sparked a nuclear disaster that has left the area uninhabitable. (AP Photo/Google) EDITORIAL USE ONLY
In this screenshot made from the Google Maps website provided Wednesday, March 27, 2013, by Google, a collapsed house is seen, top, in March, 2013, with its location pinpointed on a map below, in Namie, Japan, a nuclear no-go zone where former residents have been unable to live since they fled a radiation spewing from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant two years ago. Google Street View is giving the world a rare glimpse into Japan’s eerie ghost town, following the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami which sparked a nuclear disaster that has left the area uninhabitable. (AP Photo/Google) EDITORIAL USE ONLY
In this screenshot made from the Google Maps website provided Wednesday, March 27, 2013, by Google, a collapsed house is seen, top, in March, 2013, with its location pinpointed on a map below, in Namie, Japan, a nuclear no-go zone where former residents have been unable to live since they fled a radiation spewing from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant two years ago. Google Street View is giving the world a rare glimpse into Japan’s eerie ghost town, following the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami which sparked a nuclear disaster that has left the area uninhabitable. (AP Photo/Google) EDITORIAL USE ONLY