Superstorm Sandy’s Extremes Facts

Hurricane Sandy, after killing at least 69 people in the Caribbean, streamed northward, merged with two wintry weather systems and socked the Northeast, mid-Atlantic and Great Lakes with wind, waves, rain and snow. Some figures associated with Sandy’s rampage through the U.S., as of Wednesday night:

— Maximum size of storm: 1,000 miles across

— Highest storm surge: 14.6 feet at Bergen Point, N.J.

— Number of states seeing intense effects of the storm: At least   17

— Deaths: At least 98

— Damage: Estimated property losses at $20 billion, ranking the storm among the most expensive U.S. disasters

— Top wind gust on land in the U.S.: 90 mph Islip, N.Y., and Robbins Reef, N.J.

— Power outages at peak: More than 8.5 million

— Canceled airline flights: More than 19,500

— Most rainfall: 12.55 inches, at Easton, Md.

— Most snow: 34 inches at Gatlinburg, Tenn.

— Evacuation zone: Included communities in more than 400 miles of coastline from Ocean City, Md., to Dartmouth, Mass.

By The Associated Press:

Sources: National Weather Service, FlightAware, Weather Underground, AP reporting.

Related post:

  1. NASA’s Before And After Photos Of New Jersey Coastline

  2. Superstorm Sandy: Before And After Photos

  3. After Sandy, A New Storm May Hit Mid-Atlantic And New England

  4. In Photos: Mass Transit Damaged By Superstorm Sandy

  5. Photos: Superstorm Sandy Aftermath

  6. Photos: Sandy Causes Blizzards In Appalachia

  7. Photos: NYC Subways Flooded By Hurricane Sandy

  8. Photos: Fire And Water Destroyed Homes In NYC’s Queens Breezy Point And Belle Harbor

  9. At Least 50 Houses Flooded By Sandy Destroyed By NYC Fire

  10. In Picture: Superstorm Sandy Slams New Jersey Coast, Sends 13 Feet Surge In NYC

  11. Photos: Eastern US Braces For Superstorm Sandy

  12. Sandy: The Largest Storm To Hit The US?

  13. Photos: Hurricane Sandy Left Bahamas, 43 Killed In Caribbean

  14. Hurricane Sandy Pounds Jamaica

  1.  

In Photos: Mass Transit Damaged By Superstorm Sandy

Superstorm Sandy had caused huge damages to all of the mass transit systems especially in New York City and New Jersey.

The New York City’s subway system will be reopened on Thursday but it will be offering only limited services.

Please click here for:  Photos: NYC Subways Flooded By Hurricane Sandy.

The subways:

The South Ferry Whitehall St. subway exit in the financial district of Manhattan is shown in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy in this still image taken from video released by New York Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA), in New York, October 30, 2012. One of the biggest questions now is who will pay for the extensive damage to municipal infrastructure, subway tunnels, train tracks, electrical transformers, coastal boardwalks and piers, that Sandy left behind along the East Coast. REUTERS/MTA /Handout
The South Ferry Whitehall St. subway entrance in the financial district of Manhattan is shown in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy in this still image taken from video released by New York Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA), in New York, October 30, 2012. REUTERS/MTA /Handout
Employees from MTA New York City Transit worked to restore the South Ferry subway station after it was flooded by seawater during Hurricane Sandy. Photo: Metropolitan Transportation Authority / Patrick Cashin.
This Oct. 30, 2012, photo provided by New York’s Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) shows a flooded escalator in the South Ferry station of the No. 1 subway line, in lower Manhattan, after Superstorm Sandy passed through New York. Floodwaters that poured into New York’s deepest subway tunnels may pose the biggest obstacle to the city’s recovery from the worst natural disaster in the transit system’s 108-year history but on Wednesday Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced limited subway service will resume on Thursday. (AP Photo/Metropolitan Transportation Authority)

The railroads:

Damage on the New York City Subway’s Rockaway Line (A train). Photo: MTA New York City Transit / Leonard Wiggins
Damage on the New York City Subway’s Rockaway Line (A train). Photo: MTA New York City Transit / Leonard Wiggins
Flooding at Metro-North’s Harmon Yard on the Hudson Line. Photo: MTA Long Island Rail Road.
Flooding and damage to Metro-North’s system — in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy — to the bridge and south yard at Harmon. Photo: MTA New York City Transit
Flood waters entered the Long Island Rail Road’s West Side Yard. All trains had been removed from the yard prior to the arrival of the storm. Photo: MTA Long Island Rail Road.
Flood waters entered the Long Island Rail Road’s West Side Yard. All trains had been removed from the yard prior to the arrival of the storm. Photo: MTA Long Island Rail Road.

The busses and taxis:

Water reaches the street level of the Battery Park Underpass, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in New York. Sandy arrived along the East Coast and morphed into a huge and problematic system, putting more than 7.5 million homes and businesses in the dark and causing a number of deaths. (AP Photo/Louis Lanzano)
Governor Andrew M. Cuomo toured the Hugh L. Carey Tunnel (formerly known as the Brooklyn Battery Tunnel) on Oct. 30, 2012, with MTA Chairman and CEO Joseph J. Lhota and Jim Ferrara, President of MTA Bridges and Tunnels. The tunnel flooded during Hurricane Sandy. Photo: Metropolitan Transportation Authority / Patrick Cashin.
Taxis are submerged in floodwaters in the wake of superstorm Sandy on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Weehawken, N.J. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Mike Groll)
A parking lot full of yellow cabs is flooded as a result of superstorm Sandy on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012 in Hoboken, NJ. (AP Photo/Charles Sykes)

Related Post:

  1. NASA’s Before And After Photos Of New Jersey Coastline

  2. Superstorm Sandy: Before And After Photos

  1. After Sandy, A New Storm May Hit Mid-Atlantic And New England

  2. Photos: Superstorm Sandy Aftermath

  3. Photos: Sandy Causes Blizzards In Appalachia

  4. Photos: NYC Subways Flooded By Hurricane Sandy

  5. Photos: Fire And Water Destroyed Homes In NYC’s Queens Breezy Point And Belle Harbor

  6. At Least 50 Houses Flooded By Sandy Destroyed By NYC Fire

  7. In Picture: Superstorm Sandy Slams New Jersey Coast, Sends 13 Feet Surge In NYC

  8. Photos: Eastern US Braces For Superstorm Sandy

  9. Sandy: The Largest Storm To Hit The US?

  10. Photos: Hurricane Sandy Left Bahamas, 43 Killed In Caribbean

  11. Hurricane Sandy Pounds Jamaica

Fuel Tanker Explosion Kills 22 In Riyadh

Saudi officials said the explosion was caused when a truck carrying flammable liquids crashed [Abdullah al-Saery]

Updated News: At least 23 were killed and at least 135 were injured in this disaster.

A fuel tanker crashed into a flyover causing an explosion  around 7.20 a.m. local time on Thursday, November 1, 2012 near the Saudi National Guard building in eastern Riyadh’s industrial area.

The Associated Press reported that at least 14 people were killed and at least 60 people were injured.

A several story industrial building collapsed by the blast, leaving only one corner standing.

Several other vehicles on the flyover were set on fire because of the explosion.

Other nearby building were also damaged.

The death toll could rise as rescue crews picked through the charred vehicles and rubble.

Smoke rises after an explosion which severely damaged an industrial building in eastern Riyadh November 1, 2012. At least 10 people were killed when a fuel truck crashed into a flyover in the Saudi capital Riyadh on Thursday, triggering the explosion that caused the collapse of the industrial building, a witness and television reports said. Al Arabiya and Al Jazeera television stations reported that in addition to the deaths, at least 50 people were injured. REUTERS/Stringe
People stand near a collapsed bridge after an explosion which severely damaged an industrial building in eastern Riyadh, November 1, 2012. REUTERS/Stringer

Superstorm Sandy: Before And After Photos

Superstorm Sandy brought destructive force of the powerful wind gusts, torrential rains and massive storm surges that killed at least 64 people and caused billions of dollars in damages throughout the East Coast.

The Battery Park underpass in New York City took on about 12 feet of water during the storm.

Before Sandy:

(Google Maps)

After Sandy:

(Getty)

Before Sandy:

Seaside, N.J., was a bustling destination featuring a roller coaster and Ferris wheel along the Jersey Shore. (Yahoo! Travel/Dan Beards/flickr)

After:

But Sandy swept the roller coaster into the ocean. (Reuters)

Before:

The OC Fishing Pier in Ocean City, Md., survived Hurricane Irene a year ago. (Laura Emmons/The Daily Times)

After:

Only part of the pier held up after Sandy. (AP)

Before:

The historic boardwalk in Atlantic City, N.J., has seen better times. (Yahoo! Travel/londondreamer2/flickr)

After:

Sandy ravaged the famed boardwalk. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

Before:

The Bounty before the storm. (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)

After: 

The Bounty sank in the Atlantic, 90 miles off Cape Hatteras, N.C.

Related posts:

  1. NASA’s Before And After Photos Of New Jersey Coastline.

  2. After Sandy, A New Storm May Hit Mid-Atlantic And New England

  3. Superstorm Sandy’s Extremes Facts

  4. In Photos: Mass Transit Damaged By Superstorm Sandy

  5. Photos: Superstorm Sandy Aftermath

  6. Photos: Sandy Causes Blizzards In Appalachia

  7. Photos: NYC Subways Flooded By Hurricane Sandy

  8. Photos: Fire And Water Destroyed Homes In NYC’s Queens Breezy Point And Belle Harbor

  9. At Least 50 Houses Flooded By Sandy Destroyed By NYC Fire

  10. In Picture: Superstorm Sandy Slams New Jersey Coast, Sends 13 Feet Surge In NYC

  11. Photos: Eastern US Braces For Superstorm Sandy

  12. Sandy: The Largest Storm To Hit The US?

  13. Photos: Hurricane Sandy Left Bahamas, 43 Killed In Caribbean

  14. Hurricane Sandy Pounds Jamaica

Pinchy, The Mass Orange And Black “Split” Lobster

 “Pinchy”, the black and orange lobster. (Photo Credit: New England Aquarium)

Last week a lobsterman from Salem, Massachusetts, Dana Duhaime caught a rare lobster in one of his traps in Bakers Channel.

The 1-pound, rare female lobster has two colours, orange and black, with the two colors perfectly split down the lobster’s back.

He named it “Pinchy” after the famous “Simpsons” TV lobster.

Biologists said that a “split” lobster that is characterized by two distinct colors on each side of its body is something that occurs once out of every 50 to 100 million lobsters.

“Pinchy” will soon be on public display at the  Boston’s New England Aquarium.