Russia Unveils World’s Longest Cable Bridge

View of the world’s longest cable-stayed suspension bridge, the Russky Island bridge, on June 26, 2012, in Vladivostok. Russia on Monday unveiled the world’s longest cable-stayed bridge as it put the finishing touches on a troubled multi-billion investment aimed at revitalising the country’s distant Far East.

On July 2, 2012 the Prime Minister of Russia Dmitry Medveded opened the Russky Island bridge.

It is the world’s longest cable-stayed bridge.

The bridge also have the highest pylons and the longest cable stays.

It is 1,104 metre or 3,622 foot long, crossing over the Eastern Bosporus Strait.

The bridge links Russia’s far eastern city of  Vladivostok in Nazimov peninsula with Russky Island.

I think the bridge is very beautiful.

The Sutong Bridge that spans the Yangtze River in China used to be the longest cable-stayed bridge in the world.

Russia’s Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev walks on the world’s longest cable-stayed suspension bridge, the Russky Island bridge, in the Pacific port of Vladivostok.
A general view shows the completed bridge across the Golden Horn bay after the final section was installed in Vladivostok April 14, 2012. The bridge is part of a series of large infrastructure projects the city is undertaking for the 2012 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit. REUTERS/Yuri Maltsev
A view at night shows a bridge undergoing construction to link Russia’s far eastern city of Vladivostok with Russky Island April 12, 2012. Workers early on April 12 finished the assemblage of the last panel to link the world’s longest, according to builders, cable-stayed span 1104 metre long bridge, local media reported. The Pacific Island of Russky (Russian) near Vladivostok will host a 2012 summit of the APEC Asia-Pacific Economic Co-operation bloc. REUTERS/Yuri Maltsev
A view at night shows a bridge undergoing construction, to link Russia’s far eastern city of Vladivostok with Russky Island April 12, 2012. REUTERS/Yuri Maltsev

The World’s Largest Crocodile In Captivity

File photo taken in September 2011 shows the saltwater crocodile called “Lolong”, which was captured in the Agusan marsh on the island of Mindanao last September. Lolong has been declared the largest such reptile in captivity by the Guinness Book of World Records.

On Sunday July 1, 2012, the Guinness Book of World Records declared a saltwater crocodile weighing more than a ton as the world’s largest crocodile in captivity.

The crocodile, Lolong is  6.17 metre or 20.24 foot long.

Lolong, was captured in the Agusan marsh on the southern island of Mindanao in September 2011.

Now it is kept at the crocodile park in the southern Philippine town of Bulawan.

FILE – In this Sunday, Sept. 4, 2011 file photo, a Philippine National Police officer stands next to a giant saltwater crocodile which was captured by residents and crocodile farm staff along a creek in Bunawan town, Agusan Del Sur province, southern Philippines. Guinness World Records has declared Sunday, July 1, 2012 that the huge crocodile blamed for deadly attacks is the largest in captivity in the world. Guinness spokeswoman Anne-Lise Rouse says the saltwater crocodile nicknamed “Lolong” measured 6.17 meters (20.24 feet) and weighed more than a ton. (AP Photo/File)
FILE – In this Sunday, Sept. 4, 2011 file photo, Bunawan Mayor Edwin Cox Elorde pretends to measure a huge crocodile. (AP Photo)